After the trial: how a programme to improve the health care response to domestic violence and abuse fares in the real-world NHS

How does an intervention developed and tested by researchers make its way to the front-line of health care?

This is the topic of a new blog by Dr Natalia Lewis, a Research Fellow at Centre for Academic Primary Care in the University of Bristol.

Natalia is part of the research team investigating the impact of IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety), a general-practice-based Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) training, support and referral programme.

After the trial: how a programme to improve the health care response to domestic violence and abuse fares in the real-world NHS

BBC features CLAHRC research into pollution and young lungs

Professor Chris Griffiths featured on BBC’s the One Show last night talking about the impact of pollution on young lungs. The topical affairs programme ran a feature on the impact of poor air quality on children and young peoples (CYP) development.

Professor Griffiths is leading research into the impact of the Capitals’ upcoming Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) – introduced on April 1st – on both CYP respiratory health and physical activity levels. The ULEZ is predicted to deliver major improvements in London’s air quality, reducing nitrogen dioxide and particulate exposures in central London.

The ULEZ comes into force on April 1st

 

 

The feature runs from 6 minutes 30 seconds into last nights show

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m0003mmj/the-one-show-27032019 

You can read about this recently launched CLAHRC study here;

https://clahrc-norththames.nihr.ac.uk/systems_and_models_theme/impcact-of-ulez-on-childrens-physical-activity-and-weight/

 

Evaluation of heath impact of Low Emisison Zones makes the news

CLAHRC research investigating the impact of low emission zones on children’s physical activity and health has been featured on the BBC News

CLAHRC North Thames, in collaboration with three other CLAHRCs and a number of other research bodies, is evaluating the effects of London’s new Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) on children’s physical health and activity.

Our work is an offshoot of the CHILL (Children’s Health in London and Luton) study investigating the impact of pollution on children’s lungs.  We are using the data created by CHILL to focus specifically on the impacts on children’s physical activity and health. CHILL featured on BBC News on January 16th.

Watch a clip below to see how school children are recording the effects of pollution on their lungs. 

Professor Chris Griffiths, Chief Investigator for our work and part of the CHILL study is interviewed in the clip

 

From theoretically informed to theoretically informative improvement research

A new BMJ Quality and Safety editorial by Dr Roman Kislov, Senior Research Fellow at the Alliance Manchester Business School, has highlighted CLAHRC work as an example of successful engagement with management theory by researchers.

Dr Kislov’s research focus is the processes and practices of knowledge mobilisation, and his editorial highlights our recent paper on how different NHS Boards implement a quality improvement intervention – the QUASER guide.

He cites the paper as “an example of successfully deployed theoretically informative approach, highlighting some practical tips for researchers who aspire to move from merely applying theory towards entering into dialogue with it and, through doing so, refining its assumptions.

Read the editorial

Engaging with theory: from theoretically informed to theoretically informative improvement research

Repeated calls have been made for the increased use of theory in designing and evaluating improvement and implementation interventions.1-4 The benefits are argued to include identifying contextual influences on quality improvement (QI), supporting the generalisability of findings and anticipating how future phenomena might unfold.2 5 Most importantly, the ability of

Read the iQUASER paper

Explaining organisational responses to a board-level quality improvement intervention: findings from an evaluation in six providers in the English National Health Service

Background Healthcare systems worldwide are concerned with strengthening board-level governance of quality. We applied Lozeau, Langley and Denis’ typology (transformation, customisation, loose coupling and corruption) to describe and explain the organisational response to an improvement intervention in six hospital boards in England.

Read our BITE sized summary of the iQUASER paper

Dr Elena Pizzo

Elena is a Senior Health Economics. She holds a PhD in Economics and Management from Padua University, a Master degree in Economics and Management of Health Care Services from Ferrara University and a first degree in Economics from Padua University.

Prior to coming to UCL she was a Research Associate at the Imperial College Business School, working on the economic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Northwest London.

She previously held a research post at the Department of Economics, Ferrara University, where she collaborated to a multi-year research project and undertook an economic evaluation of a Regional Colorectal Cancer Screening Program.

Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse

Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.

In the study, published in the British Journal of General Practice today, the researchers analysed medical records of over 200,000 women of reproductive age registered with a GP and found that those who had a record of DVA were 2.06 times more likely to have a consultation for emergency contraception compared to other women, rising to 2.8 times for women aged 25-39.

The researchers also found some evidence that abused women are more likely to seek emergency contraception repeatedly.

DVA is a major public health problem, with devastating consequences for the women who experience it and great financial cost to the NHS. It is known to have a significant impact on women’s reproductive health, including an increased risk of unintended pregnancy and abortion, as abusive and controlling partners coerce women to have unprotected sex or rape them.

Although emergency hormonal contraceptive, also known as the morning-after pill, is available from pharmacies, women can also get it from their GP. Up to a third of all emergency contraceptives are prescribed by GPs.

The researchers are calling for this new evidence to be included in existing DVA training programmes for GPs and sexual health practitioners, and for the training to be extended to community pharmacists, to help them identify and refer women who have experienced DVA on to specialist support services. Such programmes are recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the World Health Organization (WHO) as part of a multi-sector response to DVA.

Joni Jackson, Research Associate from the NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research (CLAHRC) West and co-lead author of the study, said:

We found a strong positive association between exposure to domestic violence and abuse and requests for emergency contraception. Our findings are in line with evidence from studies in other countries suggesting that women experiencing DVA use more emergency contraception than other women. GPs, pharmacists and sexual health practitioners are at the frontline responding to these requests, with community pharmacists dispensing 50% of all emergency contraceptive pills. This presents an important opportunity to identify women experiencing DVA, signpost them to appropriate support services, and potentially save lives.”

Dr Natalia Lewis, from the Centre for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol and co-lead author, said:

The negative impact of domestic violence and abuse on health results in higher use of healthcare services by abused women compared to the general population. This means that healthcare services are an important point of contact for DVA victims and survivors. We have already seen improvements in GPs’ ability to identify and refer women experiencing DVA through the success of the IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety) programme. IRIS has recently been adapted for sexual and reproductive health services. Our findings support the case for adapting the IRIS intervention to the community pharmacy setting, although more research is needed to explore if and how this could be done.”

The research was supported by NIHR CLAHRC West and CLAHRC North Thames.

Papers:

Exposure to domestic violence and abuse and consultations for emergency contraception: nested case-control study in a UK primary care dataset. Joni Jackson, Natalia V Lewis, Gene S Feder, Penny Whiting, Timothy Jones, John Macleod, Maria Theresa Redaniel. British Journal of General Practice. 4 December 2018.

Use of emergency contraception among women with experience of domestic violence and abuse: a systematic review. Natalia V Lewis, Theresa HM Moore, Gene S Feder, John Macleod, Penny Whiting. BMC Family Practice. 26 September 2018.