Asthma Board game a hit

Our school asthma project is working with parents teachers and pupils from schools across to improve the ways in which schools can support young people with asthma.

The CLAHRC is working with young people to develop a suite of resources to encourage open discussion of the condition and improve understanding among peers.

This includes a school-based self-management intervention consisting of educational board and computer game which improves knowledge of triggers and inhalers, as well as encouraging discussion of asthma between pupils .

Our asthma board game (below) has gone down well with young people

As well as we have taken the game on tour at various events and open days where it has proved a hit –

Harry De Jesus

Harry is CLAHRC Research Fellow and a Senior Research Nurse working for the North Thames Clinical Research Network. His clinical background is in paediatric/neonatal intensive care and clinical research. He completed his BSc in Nursing with magna cum laude honours from the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines. He has completed an MRes in Clinical Practice and was awarded a distinction for his thesis on self management of children with IBD. As part of his dissemination of his results, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America awarded him a conference grant to present his poster on the American Advances in IBD conference.

Harry’s passion is to use participatory methodologies that listens to children’s voices using developmentally appropriate interview methods. Currently, he is spending a year on developing a PhD proposal investigating paediatric fatigue among young people with IBD.

Dipesh Patel

Dipesh Patel is a post-doctoral Advanced Orthoptist working at Moorfields Eye Hospital. His one-year CLAHRC HEE NCEL fellowship will be spent investigating factors affecting treatment outcomes in children with amblyopia (lazy eye).

Dipesh has been an Orthoptist for 10 years, and has previously researched visual field testing in children with glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmic disease.