How to guide to establish NHS youth forums

Children and young people are a key population for everyone working in the NHS and Public Health. Involving them in commissioning and designing services makes for more appropriate care that’s more likely to be taken up by those who need it

Our ground-breaking diabetes project worked with young people impacted by the condition in east London – we trained young co-inquirers in research skills so they could run community engagement events and analyse feedback on how to improve local diabetes services.

Our work was integral in shaping new NHS “how to” guidance to help commissioners and providers think through and develop youth forums to support person-centred commissioning of children and young people in health and care services.

The ‘how to guide’ is a recipient of the NHS England’s Celebrating Participation in Healthcare grant award scheme and has been authored by the University of East London (UEL)

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Professor Monica Lakhanpaul leads a multi-disciplinary translational research group at UCL, that focuses on Health Services Research which has direct impact on health policy and clinical practice. Her research program aims to take a multi-disciplinary, integrated and collaborative approach to improving outcomes for children. Her research also aims to transform services for patients.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research focuses on the translation of evidence into clinical practice and health policy, drawing together education, primary and secondary research to improve health outcomes for children. Her research crosses primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research falls under four main themes; Applied Translation of Evidence In to Policy and Practice (through systematic review, guideline development, decision and prediction rule development), Improvement Science (with a particular focus on partnership production with parents, patients and health professionals; co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions: MIA study), Conditions (with a specific interest in respiratory illness; asthma, and the acutely sick child) and Inequalities in Health (tailoring interventions for hard to reach groups, health tourism and the use of translators and interpreters to reduce inequalities).

David Law

David Law is the Chief Executive of Hertfordshire Community NHS Trust. He has also worked in primary care and community services in London prior to working in Hertfordshire. He worked in a number of planning roles in health organisations in the County during the 1990s before joining West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust in 2001 as Director of Strategy. In 2004 he was appointed Chief Executive of the Trust, a post he held till 2007.

After leaving West Hertfordshire Hospitals, David worked at Healthcare for London, initially focusing on the organisation of acute services in the capital and then on end of life care.  He worked extensively for the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Before moving to Hertfordshire Community Trust he worked on the Transforming Community Services programme in Lambeth and Southwark and in Tower Hamlets.

Dr Taryn Smith

Taryn is a Research Associate working with Professor Monica Lakhanpaul on the NEON (Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition) Project. Taryn’s background is in nutrition and her PhD research focused on establishing evidence-based dietary requirements for vitamin D in 14-18 year old adolescents. Taryn’s research interests include understanding the effects of nutrition on health outcomes in population groups at risk of nutritional deficiencies, particularly pregnant women, children and adolescents, and nutritional interventions targeted at these populations to improve health and nutritional status and avoid deficiencies.

NEON project makes the news

Our innovative Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition (NEON) project has made the headlines..in India!. The project is exploring whether a South Asian model proven to promote healthy nutrition in children can “travel” successfully to the UK and help children of Bangladeshi origin in East London.Professor Monica Lakhanpaul is leading the project and spoke to The Goan newspaper about the bi-directional exchange of knowledge that is making a difference in one of London’s less advantaged communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Harry Rutter

Harry Rutter is a public health physician. He is a senior clinical research fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; senior strategic adviser on obesity to Public Health England; an adjunct professor of public health at University College Cork; and an honorary senior clinical lecturer at the University of Oxford. He was the founder director of the National Obesity Observatory for England 2007-2011, led the development of the English National Child Measurement Programme childhood obesity surveillance system, chaired the NICE Programme Development Group (PDG) for guidance on promoting walking and cycling, was a member of the NICE PDG on preventing obesity and the Department of Health Expert Panel on obesity, sat on the management group of the Foresight Obesity project, and has helped to lead the development of the WHO Europe Health Economic Assessment Tool (WHO HEAT). He is currently involved in research assessing the role of social and environmental factors on both obesity and physical activity, and the research and policy implications of intervening in complex system.

Dr Andrew Barnfield

Based within the Department of Health Services Research and Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, I work on a joint Greater London Authority (GLA) and CLAHRC funded project that aims to evaluate the Healthy Schools London (HSL) programme. HSL was established in 2013 with the aim of improving children’s health and well-being. My responsibility using qualitative methodologies is to conduct an evaluation of HSL’s impact, and in an iterative process, inform the further development of HSL to (i) assess the potential for the HSL programme to influence educational achievement, promote healthy lifestyle behaviours, and reduce health inequalities in London, (ii) explore the extent to which becoming a Healthy School is associated with changes in school-level policies, activities, and agenda. This includes key indicators of health-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours, (iii) assess the nature and level of engagement with the HSL programme by schools and any differential uptake by socio-economic factors, and to understand the drivers and barriers to becoming a Healthy School.