Jennifer Martin

Jennifer has a BSc hons in Human Biology, Sociology and Psychology and an MSc from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has a background in non-clinical public health with experience working in Nepal and Zimbabwe. She is part of the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition team based at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. Her PhD is exploring the Reverse translation of the women’s groups using the Participatory Learning and Action Cycle from resource-limited setting to the UK. She will be adapting this model to address infant nutrition in the Bangladeshi population of Tower Hamlets, east London.

CLAHRC widens access to training by switching learning online

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

How can training in research methods for front-line NHS and public health staff be made more accessible and convenient? How do you translate a face-to-face course to an online learning resource?

Dr Helen Barratt (Deputy Director of the CLAHRC Academy) shared her experience of taking a successful face-to-face course and transforming it fully online and this work has been featured in a case study by the UCL Life Learning team entitled Translating a face-to-face course online

Our North Thames geography, plus work and time pressures faced by staff on the front line of health and health care meant that not everyone interested in our popular Introduction to Evaluation course could access our regular programme held in Central London.

In the case study Dr Barratt discusses the unique challenges of preparing and delivering online learning using digital platforms and educational tools, and provides handy tips for educators approaching similar work.

Marissa Mes

Marissa is a Dutch-Japanese student with a background in Psychology. She completed a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences with a Major in Psychology and a Minor in Statistics at University College Utrecht in the Netherlands.  This was followed by an MSc in Health Psychology (University of Bath) and an internship with the HealthTalk project at the Health Experiences Research Group (University of Oxford). Marissa’s work includes both qualitative and quantitative research. Her research interests include patient experiences of chronic illness, health inequalities, intervention implementation, and public health.

Caroline Katzer

Caroline has completed a BSc in Psychology at University of Mannheim in Germany and an MSc in Health Psychology at University of Surrey. Throughout her undergraduate degree in Mannheim she worked as a Research Assistant in the Judgement and Decision Making lab. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Caroline’s research interests include the development of complex interventions, treatment and illness perceptions in chronically ill patients, adherence to treatment as well as behaviour change in general.

Ruth Plackett

Ruth’s PhD is exploring whether using new educational technologies, such as online simulation, can improve the teaching of clinical reasoning skills for medical students. Ruth, along with her supervisors and medical experts has developed an electronic clinical reasoning educational simulation tool (eCREST). ECREST shows patients in general practice, all patients presenting with vague, non-specific respiratory symptoms, which could be indicative of serious conditions that are often missed in primary, such as lung cancer. This will allow students to practise gathering information from a patient, interpret that information and make informed decisions on diagnosis and management. Ruth is currently conducting a feasibility randomised controlled trial at three medical schools, to see whether it can improve clinical reasoning skills, and a qualitative think aloud interview study, to explore how eCREST can help students to learn clinical reasoning skills. This PhD aims to improve future doctors’ awareness of the presentation of potentially serious conditions, such as lung cancer in primary care, to help reduce future diagnostic errors.

Diarmuid Denneny

Diarmuid Denneny  is spending a year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. His fellowship will allow him to explore allied health professional training to deliver brief psychological interventions for patients with long term conditions, and is linked to the CLAHRC’s Optimising Behaviour and engagement with care theme.

 Diarmuid is  at the pain management centre at University College London Hospitals (UCLH). He has over 20 years clinical experience. He is particularly interested in neuropathic pain, persistent pain and CCBT techniques in pain management, and leads the neuropathic pain pathway including CRPS at the UCLH pain management centre. Diarmuid is a qualified independent prescriber. He is interested in the clinical application of research, and is involved in education and research at UCLH.

Dr Rachel Muir

Rachel Muir is a CLAHRC HEE NCEL post-doctoral Fellow and the Senior Matron for the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at UCLH. Her clinical background is in Critical Care, Accident and Emergency and Clinical Research, and she has a PhD in Social Sciences. Rachel is interested in knowledge mobilisation, arts based participatory methodologies, and patient experience in clinical trials. Rachel was awarded an international travel scholarship by the Florence Nightingale Foundation in 2013/2014 to visit Harvard, Toronto, and McGill in Canada to learn from innovative participatory projects to improve patient experience, and she is currently developing applications for post-doctoral funding as part of her CLAHRC HEE NCEL fellowship.

Imogen Skene

Imogen Skene is spending a year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. Her research will focus on informed consent & recruitment to clinical studies in the Emergency Department setting, and is linked to the CLAHRC’s Methodological Innovation theme. Imogen is currently a Senior Clinical Research Nurse in the Emergency Department at Barts Health NHS Trust.

Imogen obtained her BSc Adult Nursing at the University of Southampton and her MRes Clinical Research at City University London. Her MRes focused on trauma patients experience of care in the Emergency Department. She has also worked as an emergency nurse in Australia, New Zealand and the UK.