Emma Green

Emma  is a student pursuing a PhD titled “An exploration of an asset-based approach to the management of diabetes in young people: a qualitative participatory approach” supervised by Professor Angela Harden and Dr Darren Sharpe. It is embedded in the CLAHRC’s wider project examining the co-design of community-based services responsive to the needs of children and young people, which involves young people in all stages of the research process.

Jennifer Martin

Jennifer has a BSc hons in Human Biology, Sociology and Psychology and an MSc from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has a background in non-clinical public health with experience working in Nepal and Zimbabwe. She is part of the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition team based at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. Her PhD is exploring the Reverse translation of the women’s groups using the Participatory Learning and Action Cycle from resource-limited setting to the UK. She will be adapting this model to address infant nutrition in the Bangladeshi population of Tower Hamlets, east London.

Catherine Lawrence

Catherine Lawrence is the Team Lead Physiotherapist in Critical Care at University College London Hospital and is spending one year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. Catherine has a keen interest in early rehabilitation on critical care and the management of patient’s who require prolonged critical care admission.  Catherine’s research will explore the barriers to early rehabilitation on critical care.

Catherine obtained a BSc (hons) degree in Physiotherapy at Brunel University in 2010. She then went on to complete a Master of Research Degree (MRes) in Clinical Research at City, University of London. Catherine’s MRes project was focused on exploring the relationship between patient motivation and adherence to rehabilitation on critical care. Catherine is hoping to further expand on this work during her fellowship.

Enoch Kung

Enoch graduated from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology with degrees in mathematics and electronic engineering, with his PhD thesis on cyber-physical system security. He joined the Clinical Operational Research Unit (CORU) at UCL in 2017 as a research associate and is working on the development of mathematical models in the prediction of patient flow and resource demand.

UCL IRIS profile: https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=EKUNG12

Dylan Kneale

Dylan completed an ESRC-funded PhD at the Institute of Education (UCL) examining transitions to parenthood and a Postdoctoral Fellowship examining housing transitions, both using birth cohort data. Prior to returning to the IOE in late 2014, he was Head of Policy and Research at Relate (a charity specialising in the delivery of counselling and promotion of mental wellbeing) and Head of Research at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK), a think-tank exploring the implications of an ageing society. At the IOE, his research broadly involves synthesising evidence for social policy and developing methods to enhance the use of evidence in decision-making, including exploring the potential of large datasets in informing social policy. Substantively he is interested in issues encompassing demography, public health and social exclusion.

Prof Jonathan Grigg

Professor Jonathan Grigg is one of the UK’s top paediatricians and an international leader in paediatric respiratory research. Since 2003, he has obtained over £11M in research grants as PI and co-applicant from MRC, NIHR, DH and charities. These funds supported air pollution and asthma research with national and international impact. He is the lead paediatrician for government advice on air pollution and children’s health as a member of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, and provides ad hoc advice on respiratory toxicity to the Committee on Carcinogens. He co-chairs the Royal College of Physicians Committee into “air pollution throughout the life course”. In leading the national paediatric research agenda, he organises all paediatric input into British Thoracic Society’s meetings, and as elected secretary to the Royal College Paediatrics and Child Health’s Academic Board, organises its Annual Meeting. He develops national research priorities in paediatric respiratory medicine as Chair of the British Paediatric Respiratory Society, ex chair and, now member, of the Clinical Study Group (Respiratory) for the Medicines for Children network, NIHR Programme Grant Experts Panel. He leads on paediatric respiratory infection and immunology as elected chair of this group in the European Respiratory Society. Nationally, he evaluates the cost effectiveness of therapies, as the paediatric lead of NICE Appraisal Panel A, and is an RCPCH-appointed expert adviser on asthma therapies to other appraisal panels. Locally, he leads on paediatric non-medicines research in NE London as regional LCRN representative to the national committee, and supports academic training as the RCPCH regional academic advisor.

Dr Mariana Pinto da Costa

Dr Mariana Pinto de Costa is a Portuguese psychiatrist.  She is a Doctoral research fellow at the Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry (WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Services Development and NIHR Global Health Group) at Queen Mary University of London, and a Lecturer at the Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar Institute at the University of Porto.

In her current research, she has been exploring social relationships between people with psychosis and volunteers, through different formats (face-to-face and digitally), collecting views of different stakeholders (mental health professionals, volunteers and patients) in 3 European countries.

She is enthusiastic about making the most of technology to connect people and has developed a new intervention using smartphones – the Phone Pal study (ISRCTN 17586238), of which she is the Chief Investigator.

Steven Towndrow

Steven Towndrow is a patient and public involvement specialist with extensive experience across the voluntary and health sectors.  His career has focused on capturing and actioning the views of service users from across health and social care, and facilitating partnerships between the public and professionals. Steven has worked with professional associations, regulators, charities and the NHS – his past roles have included being part of the patient experience team at a major London NHS Trust and engagement lead for Westminster Local Involvement Network. From 2013 onwards Steven has been patient and public involvement lead for NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) North Thames, hosted by Barts Health NHS Trust.