What adaptations are needed to deliver psychological therapies in inpatient settings?

Psychological therapies (sometimes referred to as ‘talking therapies’) offer a chance for patients to explore difficulties in a safe and confidential setting. The therapy is delivered by a qualified professional, working in partnership with a patient to help them better understand feelings that arise from their past experiences, and attitudes towards them. Evidence suggests these therapies can make a big impact on psychiatric patients current and future wellbeing. However, they are a challenge to deliver in inpatient environments due to the short-term nature of many inpatients’ stay, added to the complex needs they often present with.

Dr Lisa Wood is a Care Pathway Lead Psychologist at North East London NHS Foundation Trust (NELFT) as well as a Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of Essex. Dr Wood spent a year with the CLAHRC as part of a Fellowship funded by HEE NCEL to hone her research skills and develop research interests in her specialist area – understanding the lived experience of psychosis from a service user perspective.

In newly published research, Lisa explored the adaptations required to deliver psychological therapies to this population from the perspective of inpatient psychological practitioners. Through interviews with inpatient psychological practitioners, Dr Wood and her research team sought the adaptations required to deliver psychological interventions in this context.

Read the paper

Qual Health Res. 2019 Apr 23:1049732319843499. doi: 10.1177/1049732319843499
Psychologists’ Perspectives on the implementation of Psychological Therapy for Psychosis in the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Setting.
Wood L Williams C Billings J Johnson S
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31014190

 

Congratulations to CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow Pinkie Chambers

Pinkie Chambers, a senior pharmacist at UCLH and former CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow is celebrating success in securing a prestigious NIHR Fellowship award.

After spending a year with the CLAHRC to hone her research skills, and against stiff competition, Pinkie secured a Doctoral Research Fellowship (DRF), which offers 3 years full-time funding (or 4 or 5 years part-time) to undertake a PhD.

The DRF is aimed at individuals, of outstanding potential, early in their research careers.

The Fellowship scheme aims to fast-track them through a customised research training programme in an environment reflecting their individual talents and training needs.

It is anticipated that successful applicants would become independent research leaders within 6 to 10 years of completing the DRF award.

During her year with us as a CLAHRC/HEE NCEL Fellow Pinkie developed her skills and worked on her application to the NIHR.

Her areas of interest include improving the chemotherapy pathway for cancer patients, and supporting patients to self-administer some of their blood tests to avoid hospital visits.

As well as her work as a Senior pharmacist at UCLH, Pinkie is also Joint Chair of the London Cancer Chemotherapy Expert Reference Group.

In particular Pinkie was commended by the NIHR for her efforts to involve patients and the public in her work which were described as “exceptional” – thanks in no small part to the CLAHRC’ Research Advisory Panel who Pinkie worked with during her CLAHRC/HEE NCEL Fellowship and who she presented to twice.

Read more about Pinkie’s time with us here

Our congratulations to Pinkie and best wishes for her future career

Success for CLAHRC Fellow Emma Dunphy

Physiotherapist and CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow Emma Dunphy has been successful in her application for a prestigious Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship with the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Emma’s proposed research will develop an E-Health intervention to improve rehabilitation for anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

After spending a year with the CLAHRC on our fellowship scheme honing her research skills Emma successfully applied to the NIHR scheme against stiff competition.

The HEE/NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship (CDRF) Scheme is aimed at registered non-medical healthcare professionals sited in England with at least 1 year’s experience of clinical practice, sufficient research experience or training to prepare them to undertake a PhD, and who wish to obtain a PhD by research whilst continuing to develop their clinical skills.

The full title for Emma’s research under the scheme will be Development of a model of service delivery to standardise anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation in the NHS and testing the feasibility of an E-Health intervention to support delivery of this model.

See a poster outlining Emma’s work below or download a PDF here.