Seminar on the role of boards in quality improvement brings together NHS leaders and board members

NIHR CLAHRC North Thames welcomed over 40 leaders and board members from our partner organisations and beyond for a seminar focusing on the Role of Boards in Quality Improvement.

We welcomed Tim Melville-Ross CBE, Chair, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust who chaired the event , drawing on his long experience on boards in both the private and public sectors.

Our keynote speaker was Professor Naomi Chambers, Professor of Healthcare Management of Alliance Manchester Business School who drew on her extensive research on different Board models across sectors and geographies to set out the characteristics of effective board working for quality improvement in health care.

You can view Professor Chambers’ presentation here

Professor Naomi Fulop, Professor of Health Care Organisation and Management at University College London and Principal Investigator of our iQUASER project hosted the event and presented some early findings of note from the project

View Professor Fulop’s presentation here

Dr James Mountford, Director of Quality and Capability at UCLPartners facilitated table discussions at the event

Our thanks to our chair, speakers, facilitators and all those who took the time to attend.

 

Watch a short film about the event

iQUASER features at Barts research evening

As part of our engagement with the public Dr Linda Pomeroy presented the CLAHRC’s  iQUASER study at a recent Bart’s Health research evening.

The event gave us a chance to showcase the project which is evaluating the impact of implementing QUASER – a Board-level intervention NHS Trust leaders can use to diagnoses the strengths and weaknesses in their approach to delivering quality improvement.

Linda discussed the importance of NHS Boards setting the direction for Trusts and leading on efforts to improve quality and safety, and how this impacts patient care at ward level.

Our thanks to Bart’s Health for giving us the chance to present our work.

Reaching out to COPD sufferers – patient experience and priorities

A project under our Innovations in systems and models of health and health care theme is looking at the effectiveness of interventions in general practice to manage one of the UK’s biggest long-term conditions – chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The Innovations to improve pathway for people with COPD project is evaluating what works to better manage this respiratory condition. The team are measuring whether a variety of interventions will make GPs’ management of patients with the condition more effective and efficient in the long-term.

As part of our engagement with patients the project’s Senior Research Associate and Research Associate visited Havering Breathe Easy Group. The Breathe Easy network provides support and information for people living with a lung condition, and those looking after them.

As well as getting insight on living with COPD and variations in service patients’ can experience,  researchers wanted to get a feel for what aspects of GP care were most important to patients’ health and quality of life.

We asked patients to identify what they thought were the most important interventions general practices provided to support COPD sufferers. Our choices were based on a list of activities that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) – the independent organisation which decides which drugs and treatments are available on the NHS in England and Wales – has recommended should be delivered as part of COPD care from general practice.

What GP service patients valued most What GP services patients valued least
Annual reviews with their GP Smoking cessation advice
Pulmonary rehab (exercise and education and to manage their condition) Spirometry Testing/Diagnosis (to diagnose a condition and monitor lung function)
Rescue Packs (of emergency medicines) Medication/Inhalers
Self-management of care Vaccination


How this will help our research

  • If we need to decide what weight we give to different outcomes, patients’ views of their relative importance could be one factor we consider.
  • Whether the measures we are using in our research are the ones patients consider most important
  • Patients’ views will provide useful pointers and questions for interviews with general practice staff that are part of our research