CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine joins Lancet-LSE commission on future of the NHS

CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine has been invited to be part of a major new independent inquiry considering the future of the NHS.

Professor Raine joins the Future of the NHS Commission which launched on November 30th and is organised by the London School of Economics and The Lancet. It will investigate and report on options for relieving the growing pressures on the system and ensuring that the service has governance, care, operating, and funding models fit-for-purpose in the 21st Century.

CLAHRC Director Rosalind Raine is Professor of Health Care Evaluation and the Head of the Department of Applied Health Research at UCL, as well as being an NIHR Senior Investigator

Professor Raine will draw on her expertise in evaluations of NHS interventions and research experience in inequalities in the distribution of health care, its causes, impact on health inequalities and policy responses.  She has long advised national, international and regional policy makers, her research being highly valued due to its diversity (spans acute & chronic conditions and all NHS settings), representativeness (national datasets, long time periods) and applied nature, allowing direct policy translation.

Calls for a rational, considered view of the NHS have come from across the political spectrum (see below) and the Commission will draw on a range of views and perspectives in its work. In April 2017 The Lancet argued that “An independent inquiry is needed to bring together clinical and policy experts, and the voices of the public and patients, to answer the question: what sort of NHS do we want and need in 2020, 2025, and 2030?”

Changing behaviour to improve adherence to asthma medication

CLAHRC behaviour change researchers and PhDs Caroline Katzer and Marissa Mes were a big hit at the recent in ESPACOMP conference in Budapest Hungary. Caroline and Marissa presented to an audience of clinicians and allied health professionals interested in adherence

ESPACOMP (European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance and Persistence) promotes science concerned with the assessment of what patients do with medicines they have been prescribed – and the implications when they adhere, or don’t adhere to them. Their 2017 conference brought together behaviour change practitioners and researchers from across the world and both Marissa and Caroline’s presentation generated much interest and a host of questions from the audience.

Both Caroline and Marissa are conducting their PhDs as as part of our wider work examining the effectiveness of  the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Intervention’ (PAPI) in improving adherence to asthma medication.

 

Marissa (above) is investigating the effectiveness of pharmacists as the delivery channel of a theory-based intervention to support medication adherence in adults with asthma.

Caroline is focusing her PhD on developing the PAPI intervention to support adherence to maintenance treatment in adult asthma patients.

Both fielded questions from pharmacists interested in how their research/academic findings were going to be translated into pharmacy practice, and how feasible this would be.

Public health research: CLAHRC represented at prestigious Lancet conference

Three CLAHRC researchers were among those presenting their work at the Lancet’s prestigious event Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health held in London on November 24th.

Each of the CLAHRC’s researchers presented a poster about their work, and the topics highlight the breadth of our research. Their abstracts are now published in a special edition of the journal.

Dr Chiara De Poli presented projections of the likely impact of the various interventions currently being used to prevent diabetes across England.

Dr Esther Kwong presented her work exploring the potential for  patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) – patient questionnaires used to measure measures health gain in patients undergoing a number of surgeries – to be used when patients were admitted as an emergency.

Jennifer Martin presented her work on participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings.

 

Impact of interventions to prevent diabetes in England: a simulation model

De Poli, Chiara et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S36

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32971-9/fulltext

 

Can patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) be used in emergency admissions? Comparison of retrospective and contemporaneous PROMs after hip and knee replacement: a cohort study

Kwong, Esther et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S55

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32990-2/fulltext

 

Adaptations to the participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings: an observational study

Martin, Jennifer S et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S63

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32998-7/fulltext

 

 

CLAHRC influences government policy on mental health in schools

A new Government green paper offers good news for those calling for joined up care between schools and local mental health services for children and young people.

Allocating resources in difficult times; balancing public perception of need and where money is best spent

Health economics and economic evaluations of care are a key theme within our CLAHRC, and the subject of one of our successful Academy short course for front-line NHS and Public health professionals.

CLAHRC researcher and health economist Dr Elena Pizzo gave a lecture at the Royal Society of Medicines September event – the ‘4th breast cancer forum: screening, metastatic breast cancer and living with and beyond

This is now available to view via this link or clicking on the image below

Dr Pizzo’s presentation examined how money is best spent in patient treatment. Elena considered the average cost of breast cancer care per patient and outlines the challenges faced by health professionals and economists when deciding how treatment funding is allocated.

Dr Pizzo made a plea for health professionals, policy makers, industry and patients to work closely with health economists when making difficult decisions about where to allocate resources. In this case the topic was cancer but the message applies equally to many other specialties when NHS budgets are under pressure.

Evidence in public health decision-making – its creators and users need to come together

Decision-makers in public health can be confronted with a huge volume of data, evidence, reviews and summaries – from local and national sources. There is also an acknowledged gap between evidence and policy in public health.

In a recent blog on the EPPI centre website CLAHRC researchers Dylan Kneale and Antonio Rojas-García reflect on their work exploring the use of evidence in local public health decision-making – and raise the question – How much research is being wasted because it is not generalisable in local settings?

While reduced resources make judicious use of evidence more important than ever when deciding how and where to apply resources, researchers also need to understand, and better communicate, the generalisability of their research evidence to decision-makers working locally.

Read Evidence use in public health – make-do and mend?

 

Better data to improve health and wellbeing

We have been reaching out to colleagues in local authorities and public health departments to highlight the value of research evidence in improving health and well being among local populations. The CLAHRC is forging useful links with our partners in local councils, bridging the gap between research and the front line.

Local authorities are a key audience for the CLAHRC as they are responsible for public health in their area. Public health includes prevention of illness and disease, sexual health and smoking cessation.

CLAHRC partners Islington and Camden Councils run lunchtime learning sessions for staff as part of their Using Data Better initiative. They invite speakers from various sectors to present the potential for data to improve health and health services for local residents. The boroughs have joined forces to deliver public health, and have a team of data analysts at work –  identifying issues that have a negative effect on people’s health, and planning to deal with those issues.

In October Dr Chiara De Poli (below left) presented to public health staff and analysts in the two Councils.  Chiara was joined by the CLAHRC’s Professor Gwyn Bevan and health economist Dr Elena Pizzo, presenting evidence of the limited impact of current policy options on the projected diabetes ‘epidemic’ in Islington, which stimulated a lively discussion about what Islington might do to tackle this.

Chiara’s work is part of a wider CLAHRC study, led by Professor Bevan, investigating the design of research and decision support processes to ensure the utility of research outputs. We are making efforts to make our research more “user friendly” and accessible to colleagues in the NHS and local government so they can use it in decision-making around planning and commissioning services and interventions for the populations they serve.

There was learning on both sides – our researchers got an insight into the challenges faced by staff on the front line and an appreciation of the type of data local authorities collect and analyse to improve health and well-being. We offered projections on the likely impact on diabetes prevention of current policies adopted by local authorities.

Feedback from our audience was extremely positive and we hope this is the start of a fruitful collaboration between the CLAHRC and the Public health teams within Islington and Camden.

“Once again, thanks for delivering a wonderful presentation – many of us were fascinated by your progress, and it’s no surprise that our head of dept. is now keen to collaborate further”

Mustafa Kamara, Intelligence & Information Analyst, Camden and Islington Public Health

Patient and public involvement – learning and sharing with Peninsula CLAHRC

We recently went on a “learning exchange” visit to our friends and colleagues at NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula (PenCLAHRC).

It was a chance for researchers, staff and patient and public contributors from both CLAHRCs to meet each other.

We also took advantage of the combined expertise and experience of the assembled group to look at a research study early in development.

Read a report of the day here.

 

 

Brian Turley Awards for Patient and Public Involvement

CLAHRC North Thames has joined colleagues at CLAHRC North West London (NWL) and CLAHRC South London to present the Brian Turley Awards for Patient and Carer Involvement

The three London CLAHRCS are proud to present these awards, created to celebrate and promote patient and carer involvement in healthcare research and improvement. The awards honour the memory of Brian Turley, a dedicated and committed patient advocate and disability rights campaigner who sadly died unexpectedly in February 2016.

The awards honour the contribution of Brian Turley a tireless patient advocate and campaigner for disability rights

The awards aim to celebrate and promote patient and carer involvement in healthcare research and improvement – aiming to

  • Raise the profile of involvement
  • Showcase examples from practice
  • Promote reflection and shared learning
  • Discourage ‘tick box practice’

For all three awards, we welcome nominations from teams and individuals who are actively and currently involved or working with patients/carers and the wider community.

Winners will get the chance to work with artist Sandra Howgate to develop materials of their choice – a picture, flyer, poster or other graphic that represents their work

Read about last year’s winners

Closing date 12 Noon on Thursday 1st March 2018

Background information to help you prepare

Information about eligibility and how to nominate (Brian_Turley_Awards_Eligibility criteria)

Information about preparing a nomination (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination information)

Nomination Form (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination form)

The awards categories

Category 1 – Teams working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities

Category 2 – Early career researcher, including PhD students, service user researchers and members of CLAHRC Fellowship Programmes

Category 3 – Patient/Service User/Carer with influence

For more information contact:

Rachel Matthews – NIHR CLAHRC Northwest London r.matthews@imperial.ac.uk

07889 179 034

Stan Papoulias – NIHR CLAHRC South London konstantina.papoulia@kcl.ac.uk 

+44 (0) 20 7848 5077

Steven Towndrow – NIHR CLAHRC North Thames s.towndrow@ucl.ac.uk

+44 (0)203 108 3241

The role of board-level clinical leaders in quality improvement

CLAHRC researcher Dr Lorelei Jones has been invited to deliver a seminar on the role of clinical leaders on NHS boards in quality improvement (QI).

The Health Services Research Centre is a leading authority on health care management and has invited Lorelei as part of their prestigious events series.

The poster below gives an overview of what she will be covering.

Dr Jones is part of our iQUASER study looking at how NHS boards implement QUASER – a dialogical tool for senior hospital leaders to develop and implement QI strategies across their organisation.

Lorelei will be presenting some results from her extensive fieldwork among NHS boards for this research, which involved interviewing board members, observing meetings and scrutinising papers and documents.