Introduction to Economic Evaluation

February 27, 2019 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Do you need to demonstrate the economic impact of projects in your organisation?

Do you want to assess the outcomes and sustainability of a new service?

Are you tasked with carrying out an economic evaluation, but don’t know where to start?

This one day, hands-on workshop aims to provide an introduction to addressing these challenges.  It is run by the NIHR CLAHRC North Thames Academy.  The course is aimed at staff in frontline services in the NHS and local government, who have limited experience of conducting evaluations and decision making analysis.

After attending this course, you will have the skills and knowledge to undertake your own simple economic evaluation of a local intervention or service, and be able to appraise other evaluations.

The course will cover:

  • introduce the basic principles of economic evaluation methods
  • explain how to assess the costs of an intervention/service
  • explain how to measure and value outcomes of an intervention/service
  • give practical examples of economic evaluation analysis
  • help to understand how to use economic evaluation in decision making
  • offer the opportunity to discuss in small groups the economic evaluation you are doing or thinking of doing.  A facilitator will help scope your economci evaluation, draft its core elements, identify the data you will need to use, think how you could overcome information or data gaps.

This workshop is suitable for staff from NHS Trusts, Local Authorities and CCGs who need to evaluate local programmes or services from an economic perspective as part of their work. It is not aimed at academics and/or researchers.

In order to be most beneficial for the participants, we invite applications from individuals who are carrying out or soon will need to carry out an economic evaluation of a service/intervention. In the selection process, we will give priority to applications providing a detailed description of such projects. Groups of people working on the same project are encouraged to apply.

No previous knowledge of economics is required (or experience of study design and statistics), however an interest in economics and being comfortable with numbers is desirable.

All participants will receive a certificate of attendance.

Cost – This course is free for staff working in NIHR CLAHRC North Thames partner organisations (please click here to see a list of our partners). There is a delegate fee of £250 for other attendees.

Registration – Please complete the registration form and email it to clahrc.academy@ucl.ac.uk by 5pm, Wednesday 19th December 2018.  

Please note, a cancellation fee of £100 will be charged to both partner and non-partner delegates in the event of non-attendance without notice after 5pm, Wednesday 20th February 2019

 

 

 

Evaluating a digitally-enabled care pathway for Acute Kidney Injury

A new publication highlights our work in evaluating a new patient pathway with the potential to provide clinicians with real-time data on inpatients at risk of Acute Kidney Injury.

AKI is common (affecting up to 20% of UK acute hospital admissions);  associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and expensive – excess costs to the NHS in England alone may exceed £1 billion per year.

Researchers at the Royal Free Hospital (RFH), part of London’s Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (RFLFT) have developed a digitally-enabled care pathway for inpatients, incorporating  a mobile software application – the “Streams-AKI” app – that “reads” routinely collected serum creatinine data in hospital inpatients and alerts health professionals where a patient is at risk of AKI.

We have published our protocol for this evaluation, and a postcard-style “need to know” summary – or BITE – of our research plans. We’ll measure its success for patients (in terms of speed and effectiveness of their diagnosis and care), NHS staff and clinicians (to find out what they think of the pathway) and for the NHS in terms of patients’ length of stay and costs to the service.

The protocol and BITE will interest NHS staff and clinicians working in renal care, as well as those interested in the potential of technology to improve detection and diagnosis via routinely collected data

Co-producing a ‘perfect’ care pathway for diabetes with young people

We’ve been working with young people to transform how local health diabetes services are designed and delivered for their age group.

CLAHRC researchers based at the University of East London worked with local young people to understand the options and barriers they face when given a diagnosis of diabetes and using NHS services.

We recruited a mixed young research team – in terms of age, ethnicity, faith-identities and backgrounds – who worked together over one year to help commissioners and providers better understand and address the options and barriers of delivering a ‘perfect’ care pathway.

You can see the results of this work in our latest BITE – a postcard summary of a CLAHRC research paper.

This is part of our wider work to co-design community-based diabetic services responsive to the needs of children and young people

How do older people’s social connections influence their use of preventive health care services?

Most of us have experienced the benefits of having strong and positive social relationships. We also know that a lack of these can lead to social isolation and loneliness – which are connected to illness and early death.

We know less about how social connections can influence our use of preventive health care services, such as screening, flu immunisation or health checks. Is it the quality of our relationships that matters, or how wide our networks are, or how often we are in contact with other people?

Our latest BITE – a postcard “need to know” summary of our published research – presents the findings of our investigation into whether and how social connections affect the use of recommended preventive health service programmes amongst people in their late 60s.

While it is common to target public health initiatives based on where people live or their economic and physical health circumstances, our work suggests using social connectedness indicators may also improve targeting of initiatives to increase preventive healthcare participation.

In addition, our results highlight the value of public health initiatives to increase social networks – itself a benefit beyond improving the uptake of services.

Projects

Mental Health in Emergency Departments

How effective was a programme to improve NHS orthopaedic care in England? Evaluating Getting it Right First Time (GIRFT)

NHS 111/Urgent Care Patient Relationship Manager Evaluation

Impact and experiences of delayed discharge: A mixed studies systematic review

Linkage of Health and local authority data at household level

Using MRI perfusion images to stratify brain tumours

Application of multi-state models to prostate cancer screening

Social Care Prevention

Effectiveness and acceptability of metformin in preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes in postnatal women: A feasibility study for a randomised, blinded placebo-controlled trial

Effectiveness and acceptability of myo-inositiol nutritional supplement in the prevention of gestational diabetes: a pilot placebo-controlled double-blind  randomised trial

Prevention of progression to type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes: A feasibility study for randomised trial on a Mediterranean diet

 

 

 

 

Could you be an ambassador for research?

Patient Research Ambassadors needed to promote health research from a patient point of view

We have teamed up with colleagues at the NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN) to support their Patient Research Ambassador (PRA) initiative.

The Network is looking for patients, carers, and members of the public who have taken part in research and who are passionate about it.

The Ambassadors will help improve how local people across the North Thames patch find out about and participate in clinical research and also help to increase awareness of the importance of supporting clinical research. The PRAs will play their part in ensuring research is patient and public focussed.

Examples of the type of work PRAs do are below – 

Full training and support will be available. As well as a chance to learn new skills and improve how research is planned and carried out in your area you will be part of a network of PRAs.

To find out more contact CRN North Thames patient and public involvement manager Christine Menzies by emailing christine.menzies@nihr.ac.uk or calling 0207 679 9763

You can read a role description here..

Read tne full 10 things you can do to promote health research document here

Professor Jonathan Grigg launches new clean air coalition

CLAHRC researcher Professor Jonathan Grigg is among leading doctors, public health professionals and organizations launching a new global advocacy group to mobilize clinicians and public health professionals to advocate for clean air policies.

Inspire: Health Advocates for Clean Air (www.inspirecleanair.org) was launched in The Hague last week

Professor of Paediatric Respiratory and Environmental Medicine at Queen Mary University of London, Jonathan (below) is a leading UK paediatrician in the effects of air pollution. He is a founder member of the new interbational coalition, following his involvement in the UK based Doctors against Diesel initiative.

According to the new group nine in ten people breathe polluted air, making it the world’s leading environmental cause of death and disease. Inspire aims to bring air pollution to the forefront of health and climate agendas.

It will offer a framework to push governments to address the root causes of air pollution and advocate for clean air policies and it aligns WHO’s road map for global action, including:

  • Improve awareness in the global health community about air pollution and its health effects
  • Increase involvement of clinicians and clinical organizations in advocacy for clean air policies
  • Establish a global network of informed health-oriented champions
  • Grow public awareness of the dangers of air pollution
  • Exert political pressure on governments to encourage aggressive clean air policies

Visit www.inspirecleanair.org, where you can also join the coalition. #InspireCleanAir