Dr Anna Moore

Anna Moore is a trainee psychiatrist working in child and adolescent mental health services in Cambridge.  She is Senior Research Fellow in Child Psychiatry at the AFNCCF, and is currently leading the CLAHRC i-THRIVE Evaluation, which is evaluating the national implementation of i-THRIVE.  Anna has been awarded a national NHS Innovation Accelerator Fellowship to lead on scaling up i-THRIVE.

She is currently completing a health services research PhD focusing on mental health crisis care pathways at UCL, and is a research fellow at Cambridge.  Prior to this, Anna was Director of Mental Health at UCL Partners and the NHS Medical Director’s National Clinical Fellow to Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, working as part of the NHS Outcomes Framework team at Department of Health.  Before taking up medicine, Anna was an accountant.

“We don’t do dementia” identifying barriers to help-seeking for memory problems among Black African and Caribbean British communities.

CLAHRC researchers have heard first-hand perceptions and beliefs among Black adults that prevent them from approaching their GP when they have concerns about memory problems – an early indicator of dementia.

Focus groups and interviews revealed five main beliefs and perceptions preventing people’s seeking help for dementia:
• Forgetfulness is not indicative of dementia
• Dementia is not an illness affecting Black communities
• Memory problems are not important enough to seek medical help
• Fear of lifestyle changes
• Confidentiality, privacy and family duty

The study comprised semi-structured focus – groups and interviews, recruiting 50 participants across a range of age groups and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Harry De Jesus

Harry is CLAHRC Research Fellow and a Senior Research Nurse working for the North Thames Clinical Research Network. His clinical background is in paediatric/neonatal intensive care and clinical research. He completed his BSc in Nursing with magna cum laude honours from the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines. He has completed an MRes in Clinical Practice and was awarded a distinction for his thesis on self management of children with IBD. As part of his dissemination of his results, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America awarded him a conference grant to present his poster on the American Advances in IBD conference.

Harry’s passion is to use participatory methodologies that listens to children’s voices using developmentally appropriate interview methods. Currently, he is spending a year on developing a PhD proposal investigating paediatric fatigue among young people with IBD.

Dipesh Patel

Dipesh Patel is a post-doctoral Advanced Orthoptist working at Moorfields Eye Hospital. His one-year CLAHRC HEE NCEL fellowship will be spent investigating factors affecting treatment outcomes in children with amblyopia (lazy eye).

Dipesh has been an Orthoptist for 10 years, and has previously researched visual field testing in children with glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmic disease.

Lucie Hogger

Lucie Hogger is Clinical Lead Speech and Language Therapist at Whittington Health and working with adults with acquired communication and swallowing disorders. She is spending one year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow exploring the interactions between people living with dementia who take multiple medications and their health care professionals as part of the APOLLO-MM project http://www.polypharmacy.org.uk/.

Lucie has 10 years of experience working in the NHS and completed an MSc in Neuroscience and Communication at UCL in 2017. Her interests are in discourse analysis, neurological disorders and rehabilitation.

Meredith Hawking

Queen Mary University of London

Email: m.k.d.hawking@qmul.ac.uk

Meredith holds a Master’s in Public Health from Cardiff University, and a Human Sciences undergraduate degree from the University of Sussex. Prior to joining the institute Meredith worked for the Public Health England Primary Care Unit as a research assistant on antimicrobial stewardship projects, with a focus on understanding public perceptions of infections and antibiotics, and designing and evaluating behaviour change interventions around antibiotic taking and prescribing.

Her current research explores cardiovascular disease: understanding patient narratives around atrial fibrillation and adherence to anticoagulation.