Dr Antonio Rojas-Garcia

Antonio holds a BSc in Psychology and an MSc in Research Methods and Implementation in Psychology and Health, both from the University of Granada, Spain. He has also been awarded a Ph.D. from the University of Granada, for his work in the Andalusian School of Public Health. During this time, he was part of several research projects, mostly focused on health inequalities and health systems, prior to joining UCL.  Antonio has particular interest in research methods in health, mostly systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

NIHR CLAHRC North Thames funded PhD studentships launched

NIHR CLAHRC North Thames is now recruiting to its 2019 PhD studentships. NIHR CLAHRC North Thames is funded to conduct high quality applied health research, focused on the needs of patients and the public to produce a direct impact on health and the way health care and public health is organised and delivered.

Led by Professor Rosalind Raine (UCL), we are a collaboration of 50+ partners, including leading universities, NHS trusts, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, UCLPartners, industry and organisations representing patients and the public.

We invite applications for these 3-year PhD studentships starting October 2019 (exact date dependent on the individual university). Studentships will be based at one of the following Universities: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, University College London. Details of the individual projects and supervisors are given below. The studentships include a stipend and full UK/EU fees.

Read more about how to apply on this page;

https://clahrc-norththames.nihr.ac.uk/nihr-clahrc_north-thames-academy/phds/ 

The PHDs on offer are below:

Cancer and comorbidity: impact of comorbid conditions on equity of access and safety and outcomes of cancer treatments

CLAHRC Research area: Health Economics and Data

Developing and evaluating an online community of practice for public health decision-makers

CLAHRC Research area: Health Economics and Data

Addressing the polypharmacy challenge in working-age adults

CLAHRC Research Area: Multimorbidity

Optimising resources from the internet in primary care consultations

CLAHRC Research area: Innovation and Implementation Science

Somatic and psychotropic polypharmacy: Understanding sociodemographic factors and the effects of polypharmacy in people with mental health problems

CLAHRC Research Area: Multimorbidity

Mapping Complex CAre Pathways for Personality Disorder (MACCA-PD)

CLAHRC Research area: Mental health

Understanding and facilitating self-management in child and youth mental health for socially excluded populations

CLAHRC Research area: Mental health

Evaluating services for older adults with multimorbidity across health and social care

CLAHRC Research area: Multimorbidity

Patient experiences on inpatient psychiatric wards: does this information get used to improve outcomes?

CLAHRC Research area: Mental health

Equity in service provision for people newly diagnosed with dementia and their family

CLAHRC Research area: Mental health

Implications of digital health innovations on the demand, use, cost and experiences of health and social care services

CLAHRC Research area: Innovation and Implementation Science

 

Funded by and Supported by NIHR logos

These logos were designed to visually demonstrate funding and support of research projects by the NIHR. Supported by NIHR logos can be used by researchers, charities and companies that conduct research with the support and expertise of the NIHR Infrastructure.

Read the NIHR Guidance on the use of these logos

The ‘Funded by NIHR’ logo is for researchers/teams funded by an NIHR research programme.

  • NIHR Academy award where research is funded by the NIHR

Funded by NIHR logo – colour

Funded by NIHR logo – black

Funded by NIHR logo – white


The ‘Supported by NIHR’ logo is for users of our Network and research funders we have supported through study delivery, expertise or dedicated facilities.

Supported by NIHR logo – colour

Supported by NIHR logo – black

Supported by NIHR logo – white

Edit”Supported by NIHR logos”

 

NIHR logo

This page contains digital quality, downloadable logos for the NIHR

Read NIHR Guidance on the use of the NIHR logo


NIHR colour logo

This logo is for use on white or light backgrounds.

NIHR reversed logo

This logo is for use only on a background of NIHR navy, as illustrated below.

NIHR black logo

This logo is for use in black-and-white or greyscale materials, against white or light backgrounds.

NIHR white logo

This logo is for use on dark backgrounds, as illustrated below.

CLAHRC logo

We have been allocated a CLAHRC North Thames logo, designed by the NIHR.

The guidance on use and position of the CLAHRC logo is the same as for the NIHR logo

Below are different types of downloadable files in various formats

Read NIHR guidance on the use of this logo


CLAHRC colour logo

CLAHRC Colour Logo (PNG File)

CLAHRC Colour Logo (JPG File)

This logo is for use on white or light background


CLAHRC black logo

CLAHRC Black Logo (PNG FIle)

CLAHRC Black Logo (JPG File)

This logo is for use in black-and-white or greyscale materials, against white or light backgrounds.


CLAHRC Reversed Logo

CLAHRC Reversed Logo (PNG File)

This logo is for use only on a background of NIHR navy.


CLAHRC White Logo

CLAHRC White Logo (JPG File)

This logo is for use on dark backgrounds.

NIHR and CLAHRC logos, branding and identity guidance

Welcome to NIHR’s new visual identity



We are pleased to tell you that the NIHR has introduced a new, independent visual identity, including a new CLAHRC North Thames logo to reflect the breadth of its work across public health and the nation’s health and care system.

We have already adopted the new visual identity on our primary digital channels (website and social media) and, by mid-May, channels managed by the wider NIHR will have migrated to the new identity. 

May will also see the launch of a new audience-centred NIHR website that fully expresses the Institute’s new identity.

Acknowledging NIHR funding

You’ll find everything you need to know about the new visual identity in the NIHR’s new guidelines at www.nihr.ac.uk/branding and https://www.nihr.ac.uk/about-us/resources/branding/brand-elements/

As part of the new identity, the NIHR is keen for researchers to show they are funded/supported by NIHR. 

Please note that from 1 January 2020, printed (and digital) materials featuring the old NIHR logo with the NHS lozenge, italicised or not and colour bar, may no longer be used.

Download the files below

CLAHRC logo

NIHR logo

NIHR Supported and Funded by logos


Mechanical thrombectomy is cost-effective up to 24 hours from stroke

CLAHRC researchers demonstrate the value of intervention beyond the current recommended 6 hours

Ischaemic stroke is the most common type of stroke, occurring when a blood clot blocks an artery cutting blood flow to part of the brain. Stroke can lead to coma, severe disability and eventually death if not treated promptly. 

Mechanical clot retrieval (thrombectomy) is an intervention to remove clots when the current medical treatment (thrombolysis) is not sufficient to dissolve them.

Thrombectomy to remove a clot

Current guidance from NHS England and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) (see below) only supports this intervention within 6 hours from stroke onset.

NHS England – Clinical Commissioning Policy on Mechanical Thrombectomy for Acute Ischaemic Stroke.

NICE – Mechanical thrombectomy devices for acute ischemic stroke. Guidance MIB153. 30 July 2018 

Our researchers compared the cost-utility of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in addition to medical treatment versus medical treatment alone performed beyond 6 hours from stroke onset in the NHS.

Our research, published in the International Journal of Stroke, shows that MT is still cost-effective if performed up to 24 hours. The publication is now cited as health economics evidence in the latest NICE evidence review (Stroke (Update). Evidence review D: thrombectomy- Draft for consultation). and has been used to recommend the offer of MT up to 24 hours. 

The work demonstrates mechanical thrombectomy is cost-effective up to 24 hours from acute ischemic stroke symptom onset – we propose the NHS implements this intervention on the basis of improvement in the quality of life of patients as well as economic grounds.

Pizzo, E., Dumba, M., & Lobotesis, K. (2019).
Cost-utility analysis of mechanical thrombectomy between 6 and 24 hours in acute ischemic stroke.
International Journal of Stroke
https://doi.org/10.1177/1747493019830587