A research trial with a difference

CLAHRC Researcher Professor Jonathan Grigg has been part of the ever largest study of the effects of a biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention on health outcomes. The intervention comprising two biomass-fuelled cookstoves, a solar charger, repair and maintenance service, and user training.

Many people in low- and middle-income countries do not have access to reliable energy sources such as electricity and therefore till cook and heat their homes using solid fuels (i.e. wood, crop wastes, charcoal, coal and dung). Around 3 billion people are obliged to use such inefficient cooking fuels and technologies which produce high levels of household air pollution with a range of health-damaging pollutants, including small soot particles that penetrate deep into the lungs.

Professor Grigg, Leader of our Child Health research Theme, was part of a team investigating whether replacing open fires with cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstoves would reduce pneumonia incidence in young children.

The results, published in the Lancet found no evidence that an intervention comprising cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstoves reduced the risk of pneumonia in young children in rural Malawi. Researchers called for effective strategies to reduce the adverse health effects of household air pollution.

 

The World Health organisation (WHO) estimates exposure to air pollution from cooking with solid fuels is associated with over 4 million premature deaths worldwide every year including half a million children under the age of 5 years from pneumonia.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs292/en/

Read the full paper:

A cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention to prevent pneumonia in children under 5 years old in rural Malawi (the Cooking and Pneumonia Study): a cluster randomised controlled trial

Dr Kevin Mortimer, PhD’Correspondence information about the author Dr Kevin MortimerEmail the author Dr Kevin Mortimer, Chifundo B Ndamala, Dip, Andrew W Naunje, Jullita Malava, MPH, Cynthia Katundu, Dip, William Weston, MBChB, Deborah Havens, DO, Daniel Pope, PhD, Prof Nigel G Bruce, PhD, Prof Moffat Nyirenda, PhD, Prof Duolao Wang, PhD, Amelia Crampin, MPH, Prof Jonathan Grigg, MD, Prof John Balmes, MD, Prof Stephen B Gordon, MD

Published: 06 December 2016

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32507-7

Lancet Volume 389, No. 10065, p167–175, 14 January 2017

Making the Jump….to improved asthma management

Our Asthma Schools project is investigating asthma control among young people in schools and developing interventions to help them manage the condition better.

The project worked with Greenwich and Lewisham Young People’s Theatre (GLYPT) to produce a short film – Behind the Jump – about the importance of asthma awareness among young people. It carries an important message for all young people living with the condition.

The film was shot at the LEAP Parkour Park in Westminster, London.

 

How to guide to establish NHS youth forums

Children and young people are a key population for everyone working in the NHS and Public Health. Involving them in commissioning and designing services makes for more appropriate care that’s more likely to be taken up by those who need it

Our ground-breaking diabetes project worked with young people impacted by the condition in east London – we trained young co-inquirers in research skills so they could run community engagement events and analyse feedback on how to improve local diabetes services.

Our work was integral in shaping new NHS “how to” guidance to help commissioners and providers think through and develop youth forums to support person-centred commissioning of children and young people in health and care services.

The ‘how to guide’ is a recipient of the NHS England’s Celebrating Participation in Healthcare grant award scheme and has been authored by the University of East London (UEL)

Spreading the word about involving patients, carers and the public in research

A recent conference gave our Patient and Public Involvement Officer Steven Towndrow, joined by one of patient/public contributors Sudhir the chance to spread the word about involving patients and the public in research.

Sudhir (left) and Steven spread the word

We were invited to deliver a workshop on Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPI/E) by the Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research at University College London Hospitals Trust (UCLH) during their annual Research in Clinical Practice conference.

Sudhir and Steven delivered the seminar to an audience of nurses, midwives and Allied Health Professionals during the event which aims to involve more of these staff groups in leading NHS research.

Sudhir drew on his extensive experience of working with researchers to design and deliver projects, offering some top tips for successful involvement.

“Thank you so much for supporting our conference last week – both the workshop and exhibiting. Both were certainly popular and we’ve had really good feedback”
Professor Lesley Baillie – CNMR Director

Our thanks to the CNMR for the invite!

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Professor Monica Lakhanpaul leads a multi-disciplinary translational research group at UCL, that focuses on Health Services Research which has direct impact on health policy and clinical practice. Her research program aims to take a multi-disciplinary, integrated and collaborative approach to improving outcomes for children. Her research also aims to transform services for patients.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research focuses on the translation of evidence into clinical practice and health policy, drawing together education, primary and secondary research to improve health outcomes for children. Her research crosses primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research falls under four main themes; Applied Translation of Evidence In to Policy and Practice (through systematic review, guideline development, decision and prediction rule development), Improvement Science (with a particular focus on partnership production with parents, patients and health professionals; co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions: MIA study), Conditions (with a specific interest in respiratory illness; asthma, and the acutely sick child) and Inequalities in Health (tailoring interventions for hard to reach groups, health tourism and the use of translators and interpreters to reduce inequalities).

David Law

David Law is the Chief Executive of Hertfordshire Community NHS Trust. He has also worked in primary care and community services in London prior to working in Hertfordshire. He worked in a number of planning roles in health organisations in the County during the 1990s before joining West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust in 2001 as Director of Strategy. In 2004 he was appointed Chief Executive of the Trust, a post he held till 2007.

After leaving West Hertfordshire Hospitals, David worked at Healthcare for London, initially focusing on the organisation of acute services in the capital and then on end of life care.  He worked extensively for the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Before moving to Hertfordshire Community Trust he worked on the Transforming Community Services programme in Lambeth and Southwark and in Tower Hamlets.