A fantastic free event to celebrate life changing research

Each year, the International Clinical Trials Day is celebrated around the world on or near the 20th of May in order to celebrate the day that James Lind started his famous trial on the 20th of May 1747.

On Wednesday 24 May this year, Barts Health NHS Trust (in association with Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry) will be hosting Research Matters event as part of the annual celebration of International Clinical Trials Day. This programme will feature talks from award-winning academics and clinicians, patients and others, to showcase the high quality clinical research taking place within Barts Health hospitals. For the full programme and to register your place: https://researchmatters2017.eventbrite.co.uk

There will also be a number of additional activities taking place in May in support of International Clinical Trials Day.  Look out for information stalls at Barts Health hospitals, where you will have a chance to talk directly to research staff and learn more about ways you can get involved in clinical research.  For more information see: www.bartshealth.nhs.uk/takepart

 

 

Event date: Wednesday 24 May 2017
Event time: 5pm until 6.30pm, followed by drinks reception (approx. 1hr)
Event registration: https://researchmatters2017.eventbrite.co.uk

Formal invitation to Research Matters

The value of theory in programmes to implement clinical guidelines: Insights from a retrospective mixed-methods evaluation of a programme to increase adherence to national guidelines for chronic disease in primary care

Involving patients and the public in writing academic papers

Proving that there is always value in involving patients and the public in research, however complex and technical the topic may be, the CLAHRC’s lay document reviewers have been acknowledged in a prestigious British Medical Journal paper.

CLAHRC patient and public partners who make up our “virtual” panel of reviewers were involved in producing an academic paper published in the prestigious journal – the Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) statement.

The final published article in the prestigious British Medical Journal

In order to improve the way studies are reported in journals, researchers  developed a checklist to include all the information an author needs to report in order to make sure that readers are clear on:

  • how the research was done
  • how the results were analysed
    and
  • what the results might mean for treating conditions or health services

Researchers at the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research developed the STARI checklist to help researchers report implementation studies –  studies that develop strategies to implement interventions that have been shown to be effective but which are not yet part of routine practice.

This was described as a “difficult” request for patient and public involvement by researchers due to the complexity of the material.

Our reviewers were asked to rate the paper under a number of headings including

  • the importance of the topic
  • the papers potential to impact patient care
  • how easy the check-list would be for researchers to use
  • how easy the paper was to read and follow

The reviewers feedback on the draft was “very helpful” and they were duly acknowledged in the final publication which we believe sets a good precedent for future PPI in writing academic papers.

Full paper details

Pinnock Hilary, Barwick Melanie, Carpenter Christopher R, Eldridge Sandra, Grandes GonzaloGriffiths Chris J et al.
Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) Statement