Outstanding research recognised with 2017 Urwick Prize

CLAHRC researcher Dr Jean Ledger is being honoured for an outstanding research paper on how health care organisations use management knowledge.

Dr Ledger is one of the authors of ‘The Silent Politics of Temporal Work: A Case Study of a Management Consultancy Project to Redesign Public Health Care’ which has won the 2017 Urwick Prize, awarded annually by the Worshipful Company of Management Consultants (WCoMC) for an outstanding recent piece of research relevant to management consultancy, published in the UK. The work addresses the tension generated between consultants and clients through their different perceptions of time.

Lead authors Professors Gerry McGivern, Sue Dopson and Ewan Ferlie attended an Education Supper hosted by WCoMC and were presented with the Cup in April by the Master David Johnson BA FCMA FIMC.

Professor McGivern will be delivering the Urwick Lecture on September 13 and the team will be publishing a book – with a launch scheduled for October.

The Prize is awarded annually to honour the life and work of Colonel Lyndall Urwick, who was a distinguished writer and thinker on the topic of management in the mid-20th century and the founder of Urwick Orr Management Consultants.

Details of the full paper are below

The Silent Politics of Temporal Work: A Case Study of a Management Consultancy Project to Redesign Public Health Care     

Gerry McGivern, Sue Dopson, Ewan Ferlie, Michael Fischer, Louise Fitzgerald, Jean Ledger, and Chris Bennett

Organization Studies

First Published July 14, 2017

https://doi.org/10.1177/0170840617708004

The Power of Involving Patients and the Public

“Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) can often be something bolted on to research in a way that fits with the existing research plan. This makes research much easier to press ahead with, as the conflicting and changing opinions of the public do not need to change the planned course of progression.  Unusual then, that PPI was considered to be an integral part of Power Up, and awarded time, resources, and influence. The young people who were involved have made great use of this newfound power. The Power Up app is fantastically tailored to the target audience because the target audience made it. The novel approach to PPI used in the project was important in hearing and using the young people’s views…I would urge future researchers to consider PPI as a vital part of research proceedings, as it has been in Power Up.”  Project worker, Power Up

The Power Up study, supported by NIHR CLAHRC North Thames, has made the involvement of young people an integral part of the research process in work to develop an app to support shared decision-making in mental health. Power Up is a four-year research project to develop an app for young people to use from their first assessment with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to empower them to be actively involved in decision-making.

 

 

Young people were active participants in taking the concept of a shared decision-making tool through design, prototype, and testing through three different types of involvement: governance of the project; needs and environment analysis; and detailed input for the development of the intervention.

PPI was embedded into the project model from the outset, to be iterative and cyclical informing the development and direction of the digital tool at each stage. Involving service users resulted in the identification and implementation of multiple changes to the app, both conceptual and tangible. Several challenges associated with PPI were also encountered, warranting future research and discussion.

 

The team has published their involvement experience in a paper published in special themed edition of the Journal of Health Design entitled Patients as co-designers to improve the quality of care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edridge C L, Edbrooke-Childs J, Martin K, Delane L, Averill P, Feltham A, Rees J, Jeremy G, Chapman L, Craven M P, Wolpert M.

Power Up: Patient and public involvement in developing a shared decision-making app for mental health.
JHD. 2018;3(1):63–74. https://doi.org/10.21853/JHD.2018.40

 

 

 

Using patient information

One aspect of the GIRFT study uses statistical methods, including economic analysis, to examine ‘what works and at what cost?’

We are trying to assess whether the GIRFT programme has reduced variations in orthopaedic practice and costs, and improved patient outcomes. To do this, we are requesting confidential patient data for a group of patients who have undergone elective orthopaedic surgery between 1st April 2009 and 31st March 2018.

The data we would like to use include Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), a database containing details of all admissions to NHS hospitals in England, which is collected so that hospitals can be paid for the care they deliver. These data can also be processed and used for other purposes, such as research and planning health services. We would also like to use data from the National Joint Registry, which records details of joint replacement operations in order to monitor the results of surgery and protect patient safety.

Secure storage and processing of patient information

Researchers will not be able to identify patients, using the information that they are given by the organisations (National Joint Registry and NHS Digital). Personal identifiers of patients will only be securely transferred between these two organisations, so NHS Digital can link them together, to provide more accurate and complete information for researchers.

Both organisations will securely transfer pseudonymised data to researchers at UCL, so patient information can be processed without researchers being able to identify patients.

All pseudonymised patient information will be stored on a secure network that is password-protected, and can only be accessed by those with specialised training and access for the duration of the study.

Opting-out

If you would like further information about the use of your data in this research study, or would like to request that your confidential patient information is not included in this study, please contact us between 1st May – 1st June 2018 to discuss.

Contact details:

Dr Sarah Jasim

NIHR CLAHRC North Thames

Department of Applied Health Research

University College London

1-19 Torrington Place

London WC1E 7HB

Tel: 020 3105 3233

E-mail: clahrc.girft-evaluation@ucl.ac.uk


 

Brian Turley Awards – winners and runners up announced

The inaugural London-wide Brian Turley Patient and Carer Involvement Awards took place at the NIHR CLAHRC North West London Spring Collaborative Learning Event on the 26th April 2018. The awards, presented by Simon Denegri (below centre), National Director for Patients and Public in Health Research, celebrate and promote patient and carer involvement in healthcare research and improvement.

The Awards were created in 2017 by NIHR CLAHRC Northwest London in memory of Brian Turley (below) a dedicated and committed patient advocate and disability rights campaigner who worked closely on a project that developed the ‘My Medication Passport’. The awards aim to sustain Brian’s values and commitment to partnerships between professionals and patients, carers and the public in research and service improvement work across the capital.

There were fifteen entries from CLAHRC-funded and supported work across the capital, and feedback on the quality of entries from judges and those interested in the results was positive –

“Once again, it is been a pleasure to read about all of the projects and my sense is the quality of the applications overall is even better than last year which is heartening. Lots of useful tips and the common theme seems to be, we should have started involving patients and carers earlier. Very useful!”

Brian Turley Award Judge Jocelyn Cornwell, Director Point of Care Foundation

“It was an honour for me to be involved in this way. I found the detail of the submissions very interesting and informative. It was reassuring to see so much good work being done”

Brian Turley Award Judge Iain Baxter, Service User

“The nominations were varied and interesting projects, the inclusion of different stakeholders was very good…. As a first-time judge I felt that this was an opportunity to learn and develop a new skill”

Brian Turley Award Judge Charity Gondwe, Carer

The winners were awarded with the opportunity to work with graphic artist Sandra Howgate to prepare a visual representation of their work to promote and share their story with others.

The winners

Patient / Service user / Carer with influence Award

Sophia Kotzamanis – a parent representative for BUDS [Better Use of data to improve parent satisfaction), an Chelsea & Westminster Hospital initiative  to improve the experience parents have when their baby is admitted to a neonatal unit. Sophia has also just been awarded a place on the NIHR CLAHRC NWL Improvement Leader Fellowship.

See how Sophia worked with artist Sandra Howgate to capture her work

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

St Mark’s Hospital Patient-Centred Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Care Model at London Northwest Healthcare NHS Trust – The team involved patients and the public in a programme to improve outpatient monitoring for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) by addressing the mismatch between ‘need’ and ‘access’ to services.

You can see how the team worked with artist Sandra Howgate here

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award

Stuart Green, Public Health Research Fellow based at Imperial College London – Stuart was an integral part of a quality improvement initiative within a mental health trust which aimed to improve cardiometabolic screening of patients through the introduction of a comprehensive physical health assessment.

See the results of Stuart’s work with Sandra Howgate here

Runners up for the awards were

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

The Alcohol research team at CLAHRC South LondonTackling the stigma of alcoholism

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award) 

Physio at Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Emma Dunphy – for designing a website for people recovering from knee surgery

Patient / Service user / Carer with influence Award 

Robin Lomas who worked with UCL researchers to co-investigate the – Impact of Welfare advice in GP practices

Robin Lomas receives her award from Simon Denegri

Each CLAHRC convened a panel of judges including senior researchers, early career researchers and members of the public and patients to consider the nominations and supporting evidence provided by entrants. In all cases they were impressed by the sheer variety of work in research and service improvement going on across the three London CLAHRCs, and the uniformly high standard of entries.

“Seeing experience and involvement embraced and championed is so fantastic. Working in this way is the future of healthcare; we need to embrace partnership working. Patients are part of the solution”

Brian Turley Award Judge Ellie Wharton, Project Manager

“As a newcomer to CLAHRC, coming from a social science research context, it has been an interesting and illuminating experience to be a judge for the Brian Turley Awards”

Brian Turley Award Judge Sam Miles, Researcher

We have shared detailed feedback with all entrants and strongly encouraged them to seek channels to share their involvements stories through newsletters, websites and in journals.

St Mark’s Hospital

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

St Mark’s Hospital Patient-Centred Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Care Model at London Northwest Healthcare NHS Trust – the team involved patients and the public in a programme to improve outpatient monitoring for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) by addressing the mismatch between ‘need’ and ‘access’ to services.

Stuart Green

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award Stuart Green, Public Health Research Fellow based at Imperial College London – Stuart was an integral part of a quality improvement initiative within a mental health trust which aimed to improve cardiometabolic screening of patients through the introduction of a comprehensive physical health assessment.