Selection by a panel of clinicians and family representatives of important early morbidities associated with paediatric cardiac surgery suitable for routine monitoring using the nominal group technique and a robust voting process

Free workshop on June 22nd – Embedding innovation in the NHS: patient, practice and system perspectives

Embedding innovation in the NHS: patient, practice and system perspectives

22nd June 2017, 12-4.30pm

Woburn House, 20-24 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 9HU

 

This half-day workshop will bring together a diverse audience for lively debate and discussion about current practice in the UK’s health care innovation landscape. The workshop is a response to one of UCL’s current policy ‘grand challenges’ – understanding how innovation can be successfully embedded in the NHS, and what learning can be applied from other sectors.

 

To address this challenge, the workshop will provide a forum for exploring different perspectives on health care innovation. It will introduce tangible examples of where health innovations have been successfully developed and implemented in the NHS in recent years, highlighting the types of support mechanisms and collaborations that have made this possible. Patient demands for innovation will be discussed, as well as the organisational and system level interventions being used to drive innovation forwards in the NHS, such as new models of care.

The workshop will bring together different communities of practice to share their knowledge and experience – inventors, charities, NHS representatives, industry, academics and researchers, and those involved in policy. The format will be a mixture of panel discussions and guest speaker presentations, with time for wider group discussion and networking.

 

Confirmed panellists / contributors include:

 

Charles Tallack, Head of NHS Operational Research and Evaluation, NHS England

Katherine Langford, Programme Lead Health and Social Care, The Innovation Unit

Dr Liz Mear, Chief Executive, The Innovation Agency and Chair of the national AHSN Network

Prof Naomi Fulop, Professor of Health Care Organisation and Management, UCL

 

Date and timings: 22nd June 2017, 12pm – 4.30pm (drinks and networking 4.30pm-5pm)

 

Please register your attendance at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/embedding-innovation-in-the-nhs-tickets-34217322934

 

Acknowledgements: This event is funded by a UCL Policy Engagement grant and is hosted by UCL’s Department of Applied Health Research and Health Services Research UK (HSRUK). It is kindly being supported by individuals at The Innovation Unit, The AHSN Network and UCLP. For more information, contact Dr Jean Ledger: j.ledger@ucl.ac.uk

 

 

Photograph selected in competition for UCL India Voices poster

Congratulations go out to Jennifer Martin, who has had an image she took in India chosen to represent the UCL India Voices project in 2017.

A PhD student with the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition (NEON) project, Jennifer took the picture while conducting research with women in Mumbai. After submitting it to a UCL photography competition, Jennifer’s photograph was selected as the image for UCL India Voices poster.

Advertising UCL’s Grand Challenge of Cultural Understanding India Voices cross-disciplinary programme of film, debate and the arts, the poster can be seen across UCL.

Details of the India Voices programme can be found on the UCL Grand Challenges website.

Trends in evidence use in public health decision-making

A new CLAHRC publication offers valuable insight into the types of evidence used by decision-makers working in public health. In 2013, responsibility for public health services and planning shifted from the “health” boundary to local authority control. These services can range from health checks to open access sexual health.

CLAHRC researchers examined English local public health decision-making in a new review of what evidence is used and how by those planning, designing and commissioning services.

The review, published in a new paper in the Journal Implementation Science identifies three clear trends in evidence use

  • the primacy of local evidence
  • the important role of local experts in providing evidence and knowledge, and
  • the high value placed on local evaluation evidence despite the varying methodological rigour.

Barriers to the use of research evidence included issues around access and availability of applicable research evidence, and indications that the use of evidence could be perceived as a bureaucratic process.

This is part of a wider project entitled Exploring decision-making processes and knowledge requirements in public health

 

Read the full paper

Kneale et al. Implementation Science (2017) 12:53
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0577-9
The use of evidence in English local public health decision-making: a systematic scoping review