Brian Turley Awards – winners and runners up announced

The inaugural London-wide Brian Turley Patient and Carer Involvement Awards took place at the NIHR CLAHRC North West London Spring Collaborative Learning Event on the 26th April 2018. The awards, presented by Simon Denegri (below centre), National Director for Patients and Public in Health Research, celebrate and promote patient and carer involvement in healthcare research and improvement.

The Awards were created in 2017 by NIHR CLAHRC Northwest London in memory of Brian Turley (below) a dedicated and committed patient advocate and disability rights campaigner who worked closely on a project that developed the ‘My Medication Passport’. The awards aim to sustain Brian’s values and commitment to partnerships between professionals and patients, carers and the public in research and service improvement work across the capital.

There were fifteen entries from CLAHRC-funded and supported work across the capital, and feedback on the quality of entries from judges and those interested in the results was positive –

“Once again, it is been a pleasure to read about all of the projects and my sense is the quality of the applications overall is even better than last year which is heartening. Lots of useful tips and the common theme seems to be, we should have started involving patients and carers earlier. Very useful!”

Brian Turley Award Judge Jocelyn Cornwell, Director Point of Care Foundation

“It was an honour for me to be involved in this way. I found the detail of the submissions very interesting and informative. It was reassuring to see so much good work being done”

Brian Turley Award Judge Iain Baxter, Service User

“The nominations were varied and interesting projects, the inclusion of different stakeholders was very good…. As a first-time judge I felt that this was an opportunity to learn and develop a new skill”

Brian Turley Award Judge Charity Gondwe, Carer

The winners were awarded with the opportunity to work with graphic artist Sandra Howgate to prepare a visual representation of their work to promote and share their story with others.

The winners

Patient / Service user / Carer with influence Award

Sophia Kotzamanis – a parent representative for BUDS [Better Use of data to improve parent satisfaction), an Chelsea & Westminster Hospital initiative  to improve the experience parents have when their baby is admitted to a neonatal unit. Sophia has also just been awarded a place on the NIHR CLAHRC NWL Improvement Leader Fellowship.

See how Sophia worked with artist Sandra Howgate to capture her work

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

St Mark’s Hospital Patient-Centred Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Care Model at London Northwest Healthcare NHS Trust – The team involved patients and the public in a programme to improve outpatient monitoring for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) by addressing the mismatch between ‘need’ and ‘access’ to services.

You can see how the team worked with artist Sandra Howgate here

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award

Stuart Green, Public Health Research Fellow based at Imperial College London – Stuart was an integral part of a quality improvement initiative within a mental health trust which aimed to improve cardiometabolic screening of patients through the introduction of a comprehensive physical health assessment.

See the results of Stuart’s work with Sandra Howgate here

Runners up for the awards were

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

The Alcohol research team at CLAHRC South LondonTackling the stigma of alcoholism

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award) 

Physio at Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Emma Dunphy – for designing a website for people recovering from knee surgery

Patient / Service user / Carer with influence Award 

Robin Lomas who worked with UCL researchers to co-investigate the – Impact of Welfare advice in GP practices

Robin Lomas receives her award from Simon Denegri

Each CLAHRC convened a panel of judges including senior researchers, early career researchers and members of the public and patients to consider the nominations and supporting evidence provided by entrants. In all cases they were impressed by the sheer variety of work in research and service improvement going on across the three London CLAHRCs, and the uniformly high standard of entries.

“Seeing experience and involvement embraced and championed is so fantastic. Working in this way is the future of healthcare; we need to embrace partnership working. Patients are part of the solution”

Brian Turley Award Judge Ellie Wharton, Project Manager

“As a newcomer to CLAHRC, coming from a social science research context, it has been an interesting and illuminating experience to be a judge for the Brian Turley Awards”

Brian Turley Award Judge Sam Miles, Researcher

We have shared detailed feedback with all entrants and strongly encouraged them to seek channels to share their involvements stories through newsletters, websites and in journals.

St Mark’s Hospital

Team working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities Award

St Mark’s Hospital Patient-Centred Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Care Model at London Northwest Healthcare NHS Trust – the team involved patients and the public in a programme to improve outpatient monitoring for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) by addressing the mismatch between ‘need’ and ‘access’ to services.

Stuart Green

Early Career Researcher/PhD student/Service User Researcher/ Fellow Award Stuart Green, Public Health Research Fellow based at Imperial College London – Stuart was an integral part of a quality improvement initiative within a mental health trust which aimed to improve cardiometabolic screening of patients through the introduction of a comprehensive physical health assessment.

My health in school website up and running

CLAHRC researchers based at Queen Mary University working to positively transform the health of young people have launched the My health in school initiative and website.

‘My Health in School’ aims to support young people’s health via school-based projects.

The My health in school team (below) also includes researchers and communications experts from Queen Mary University of London, and will initially focus will on asthma in young people aged 11-13, building on CLAHRC research and engagement with young people.

Previous collaborations with pupils, teachers and parents has spawned a number of innovations to engage and educate young people living with asthma and their peers. Outputs already developed include board and computer games, a drama being delivered in a number of schools and a short film.

The team is working with Professor Jonathan Grigg, who leads several studies about asthma and lung health in children and young people.

As well as support from NIHR CLAHRC North Thames other key collaborators, include:

  • Centre of the Cell
  • GLYPT (Greenwich and Lewisham Young People’s Theatre)
  • Healthy London Partnership
  • Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research

The project is recruiting secondary schools across London – schools that are interested are encouraged to get in touch with the team – find out more about what being involved means here.

 

 

Why has the US opioid crisis not spread to the UK?

The misuse of and addiction to opioids, including prescription pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, has been labelled “a serious national crisis” in the US affecting public health as well as social and economic welfare. The US opioid epidemic has yet to cross the Atlantic to the United Kingdom. But why has opioid use reached crisis point in the US but not in the UK?

In a blog for the London School of Economics US Centre Senior Physiotherapist and CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow Diarmuid Denneny and CLAHRC Academy Teaching Fellow Silvie Cooper discuss the roots of the US crisis, and the different culture of pain management in the UK which may explain why we have not experienced the same devastating consequences…………………..

 

The Impact of Delayed Discharge

The impact of delayed discharge—defined as ‘the period of continued hospital stay after a patient is deemed medically fit to leave hospital but is unable to do so for non-medical reasons’— is an important problem for health-care providers internationally. Costs to the National Health Service (NHS) in England associated with delayed discharge are approximately £100m per year.

Beyond the financial burden this places on a hard-pressed NHS and other services, there are real implications for inpatients’ health and safety as well as the stress levels of staff and different staff groups involved in the process.

Newly published CLAHRC research – summarised in our latest BITE – assesses the impact and experiences of delayed discharge at multiple levels, from the perspective of patients, health professionals and hospitals; and associated costs of delay.

Read the full paper

Rojas-García A, Turner S, Pizzo E, Hudson E, Thomas J, Raine R.
Impact and experiences of delayed discharge: A mixed-studies systematic review.
Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy. 2017. DOI: 10.1111/hex.12619