Helping inspire the next generation of scientists

What triggers asthma symptoms?

Can you identify celebrities who live with the condition?

How much lung capacity do you have?

These were just some of the questions we asked visitors to our stall at the 2018 Barts and Queen Mary Science Festival held at Queen Mary University of London’s Mile End campus on 20 June.

The CLAHRC was represented by the My Asthma in School project team at the event aimed at secondary schools and young people interested in a career in science and medicine.

We took the chance to give visitors information on symptoms and managing the condition in schools, and raising awareness among young people they can better understand and support fellow pupils with asthma.

They could also test their lung capacity and put their results on a peak flow rate chart to see how they rated against other young people (below). The team is looking for schools to take part in their work. Signing up your school is quick and easy and will help your school support & empower young people with asthma.

The Exhibitors at the festival provided hands on activities to encourage students to learn more about careers in science.

Now in its eighth year, the 2018 festival was supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) at Barts Health NHS Trust and Queen Mary University of London, and Trials Connect.

Thank you to the team and for the invite from Barts and QMUL.

Celebrating research at UCLH

The CLAHRC was represented at the annual University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) research open day held on July 5th at the hospital. The 2018 edition of the event had special significance in the year we celebrate the NHS’ 70th birthday.


We were one of over 30 stalls at the event, which celebrates research going on across UCLH, one of the CLAHRC’s key NHS partners.

Joining our public and patient involvement officer Steven (below left) at the stall were two CLAHRC researchers Emma Dunphy and Dr Rachel Muir.

Dr Muir (below left) gave visitors an opportunity to take part in a LEGO Serious Play demonstration. LEGO Serious Play is an innovative and engaging way to construct and share knowledge and stories in research, and was initially designed to be used in the corporate world to map complex problems through shared models and landscapes. Visitors got the chance to construct mini-models in 3 minute Lego Serious Play exercises. To find out more about Rachel’s work email r.muir@ucl.ac.uk

Emma (below left) is a Senior Physiotherapist based at Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, and supports patients in their journey back to health after injury. Emma has developed TRAK, a web based resource to help with rehabilitation from Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries – particularly common among active sportspeople.

TRAK includes diagrams and short films demonstrating exercises included in a patients rehab programme, and can complement face to face therapy for those in recovery from ACL injuries. For more info on TRAK contact Emma at emma.dunphy@ucl.ac.uk

Our thanks to Emma and Rachel for their time and for UCLH for inviting us to take part and for running an excellent event as ever.