What adaptations are needed to deliver psychological therapies in inpatient settings?

Psychological therapies (sometimes referred to as ‘talking therapies’) offer a chance for patients to explore difficulties in a safe and confidential setting. The therapy is delivered by a qualified professional, working in partnership with a patient to help them better understand feelings that arise from their past experiences, and attitudes towards them. Evidence suggests these therapies can make a big impact on psychiatric patients current and future wellbeing. However, they are a challenge to deliver in inpatient environments due to the short-term nature of many inpatients’ stay, added to the complex needs they often present with.

Dr Lisa Wood is a Care Pathway Lead Psychologist at North East London NHS Foundation Trust (NELFT) as well as a Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of Essex. Dr Wood spent a year with the CLAHRC as part of a Fellowship funded by HEE NCEL to hone her research skills and develop research interests in her specialist area – understanding the lived experience of psychosis from a service user perspective.

In newly published research, Lisa explored the adaptations required to deliver psychological therapies to this population from the perspective of inpatient psychological practitioners. Through interviews with inpatient psychological practitioners, Dr Wood and her research team sought the adaptations required to deliver psychological interventions in this context.

Read the paper

Qual Health Res. 2019 Apr 23:1049732319843499. doi: 10.1177/1049732319843499
Psychologists’ Perspectives on the implementation of Psychological Therapy for Psychosis in the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Setting.
Wood L Williams C Billings J Johnson S
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31014190

 

After the trial: how a programme to improve the health care response to domestic violence and abuse fares in the real-world NHS

How does an intervention developed and tested by researchers make its way to the front-line of health care?

This is the topic of a new blog by Dr Natalia Lewis, a Research Fellow at Centre for Academic Primary Care in the University of Bristol.

Natalia is part of the research team investigating the impact of IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety), a general-practice-based Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) training, support and referral programme.

After the trial: how a programme to improve the health care response to domestic violence and abuse fares in the real-world NHS