Changing behaviour to improve adherence to asthma medication

CLAHRC behaviour change researchers and PhDs Caroline Katzer and Marissa Mes were a big hit at the recent in ESPACOMP conference in Budapest Hungary. Caroline and Marissa presented to an audience of clinicians and allied health professionals interested in adherence

ESPACOMP (European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance and Persistence) promotes science concerned with the assessment of what patients do with medicines they have been prescribed – and the implications when they adhere, or don’t adhere to them. Their 2017 conference brought together behaviour change practitioners and researchers from across the world and both Marissa and Caroline’s presentation generated much interest and a host of questions from the audience.

Both Caroline and Marissa are conducting their PhDs as as part of our wider work examining the effectiveness of  the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Intervention’ (PAPI) in improving adherence to asthma medication.

 

Marissa (above) is investigating the effectiveness of pharmacists as the delivery channel of a theory-based intervention to support medication adherence in adults with asthma.

Caroline is focusing her PhD on developing the PAPI intervention to support adherence to maintenance treatment in adult asthma patients.

Both fielded questions from pharmacists interested in how their research/academic findings were going to be translated into pharmacy practice, and how feasible this would be.

Public health research: CLAHRC represented at prestigious Lancet conference

Three CLAHRC researchers were among those presenting their work at the Lancet’s prestigious event Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health held in London on November 24th.

Each of the CLAHRC’s researchers presented a poster about their work, and the topics highlight the breadth of our research. Their abstracts are now published in a special edition of the journal.

Dr Chiara De Poli presented projections of the likely impact of the various interventions currently being used to prevent diabetes across England.

Dr Esther Kwong presented her work exploring the potential for  patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) – patient questionnaires used to measure measures health gain in patients undergoing a number of surgeries – to be used when patients were admitted as an emergency.

Jennifer Martin presented her work on participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings.

 

Impact of interventions to prevent diabetes in England: a simulation model

De Poli, Chiara et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S36

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32971-9/fulltext

 

Can patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) be used in emergency admissions? Comparison of retrospective and contemporaneous PROMs after hip and knee replacement: a cohort study

Kwong, Esther et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S55

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32990-2/fulltext

 

Adaptations to the participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings: an observational study

Martin, Jennifer S et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S63

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32998-7/fulltext

 

 

CLAHRC influences government policy on mental health in schools

A new Government green paper offers good news for those calling for joined up care between schools and local mental health services for children and young people.