CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine joins Lancet-LSE commission on future of the NHS

CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine has been invited to be part of a major new independent inquiry considering the future of the NHS.

Professor Raine joins the Future of the NHS Commission which launched on November 30th and is organised by the London School of Economics and The Lancet. It will investigate and report on options for relieving the growing pressures on the system and ensuring that the service has governance, care, operating, and funding models fit-for-purpose in the 21st Century.

CLAHRC Director Rosalind Raine is Professor of Health Care Evaluation and the Head of the Department of Applied Health Research at UCL, as well as being an NIHR Senior Investigator

Professor Raine will draw on her expertise in evaluations of NHS interventions and research experience in inequalities in the distribution of health care, its causes, impact on health inequalities and policy responses.  She has long advised national, international and regional policy makers, her research being highly valued due to its diversity (spans acute & chronic conditions and all NHS settings), representativeness (national datasets, long time periods) and applied nature, allowing direct policy translation.

Calls for a rational, considered view of the NHS have come from across the political spectrum (see below) and the Commission will draw on a range of views and perspectives in its work. In April 2017 The Lancet argued that “An independent inquiry is needed to bring together clinical and policy experts, and the voices of the public and patients, to answer the question: what sort of NHS do we want and need in 2020, 2025, and 2030?”

About the 2017 Winners

Brian Turley Awards for Patient and Carer Involvement
Collaboration for Leadership and Applied Health Research and Care Programmes in London

Based at St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, the PREPARE team, is a programme for patients undergoing oesophago-gastric surgery that aims to improve their surgical outcomes by improving their physical and mental well-being prior to and after their surgery. Each patient receives a personalised programme to match their individual needs, abilities and goals.

The programme provides coaching and tailored support in the areas of:

  • Physical fitness
  • Respiratory exercises
  • Eating well
  • Psychological wellbeing
  • Asking about medications
  • Removing bad habits
  • Enhancing recovery
The team involved patients at all stages of their programme to prepare patients undergoing oesophago-gastric surgery

Patients are involved at a strategic level in the development of the PREPARE programme, working with the clinical team to co-design the structure and goals through formal workshops and informal interactions.

An example of meaningful outcomes from patient involvement include the creation of a training clinic 1-2 weeks prior to surgery to teach patients and their carers on home jejunostomy feeds. This replaced post-surgery in-hospital training which patients described as too intimidating and did not involve carers. Patients’ views have also contributed plans to develop a PREPARE centre where the whole programme can be delivered and patients can benefit from peer-to-peer support.

On announcing the award winners the judges said: “This is a superb example of integrated, meaningful, well planned patient involvement which is central to the project. While PPI is often an added afterthought to projects, collaboration with patients is at the heart of PREPARE”

The PREPARE team worked with artist Sandra Howgate to produce this image describing their work

 

Changing behaviour to improve adherence to asthma medication

CLAHRC behaviour change researchers and PhDs Caroline Katzer and Marissa Mes were a big hit at the recent in ESPACOMP conference in Budapest Hungary. Caroline and Marissa presented to an audience of clinicians and allied health professionals interested in adherence

ESPACOMP (European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance and Persistence) promotes science concerned with the assessment of what patients do with medicines they have been prescribed – and the implications when they adhere, or don’t adhere to them. Their 2017 conference brought together behaviour change practitioners and researchers from across the world and both Marissa and Caroline’s presentation generated much interest and a host of questions from the audience.

Both Caroline and Marissa are conducting their PhDs as as part of our wider work examining the effectiveness of  the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Intervention’ (PAPI) in improving adherence to asthma medication.

 

Marissa (above) is investigating the effectiveness of pharmacists as the delivery channel of a theory-based intervention to support medication adherence in adults with asthma.

Caroline is focusing her PhD on developing the PAPI intervention to support adherence to maintenance treatment in adult asthma patients.

Both fielded questions from pharmacists interested in how their research/academic findings were going to be translated into pharmacy practice, and how feasible this would be.

Public health research: CLAHRC represented at prestigious Lancet conference

Three CLAHRC researchers were among those presenting their work at the Lancet’s prestigious event Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health held in London on November 24th.

Each of the CLAHRC’s researchers presented a poster about their work, and the topics highlight the breadth of our research. Their abstracts are now published in a special edition of the journal.

Dr Chiara De Poli presented projections of the likely impact of the various interventions currently being used to prevent diabetes across England.

Dr Esther Kwong presented her work exploring the potential for  patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) – patient questionnaires used to measure measures health gain in patients undergoing a number of surgeries – to be used when patients were admitted as an emergency.

Jennifer Martin presented her work on participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings.

 

Impact of interventions to prevent diabetes in England: a simulation model

De Poli, Chiara et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S36

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32971-9/fulltext

 

Can patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) be used in emergency admissions? Comparison of retrospective and contemporaneous PROMs after hip and knee replacement: a cohort study

Kwong, Esther et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S55

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32990-2/fulltext

 

Adaptations to the participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings: an observational study

Martin, Jennifer S et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S63

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32998-7/fulltext

 

 

CLAHRC influences government policy on mental health in schools

A new Government green paper offers good news for those calling for joined up care between schools and local mental health services for children and young people.