Top of the charts! Lancet paper on HIV testing most downloaded in 2017

The end of any year sees a number of “best of” charts published and research is no exception!

We’re delighted to report that a paper produced by the CLAHRC’s Dr Werner Leber and Professor Chris Griffiths and others is 2017’s most downloaded in The Lancet HIV. Dr Werner ‘s groundbreaking work represents the first time a model to explore the cost effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care has been applied to the UK.

The work generated great media interest (below) and offers a model to measure cost-effectiveness for commissioners and providers of HIV care.

Read the paper:

Cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care: a health economics modelling analysis
Baggaley, Rebecca F et al.
The Lancet HIV , Volume 4 , Issue 10 , e465 – e474

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30123-6/abstract 

Read the most downloaded list

Read a BITE sized summary of Werner’s work.

 

 

 

The role of board-level clinical leaders in quality improvement

CLAHRC researcher Dr Lorelei Jones has been invited to deliver a seminar on the role of clinical leaders on NHS boards in quality improvement (QI).

The Health Services Research Centre is a leading authority on health care management and has invited Lorelei as part of their prestigious events series.

The poster below gives an overview of what she will be covering.

Dr Jones is part of our iQUASER study looking at how NHS boards implement QUASER – a dialogical tool for senior hospital leaders to develop and implement QI strategies across their organisation.

Lorelei will be presenting some results from her extensive fieldwork among NHS boards for this research, which involved interviewing board members, observing meetings and scrutinising papers and documents.

Introducing innovation in the NHS – what is your experience?

Still time to tell us your experience of how innovation is adopted in the NHS

We need your views; complete the DECIDE Survey by September 30th

Decisions in health Care to Introduce or Diffuse Innovations using Evidence (or DECIDE) – is a major study investigating the role of evidence in decisions to introduce innovation.

We are seeking the views of people working in the NHS.

We want to know

  • what different types of evidence are used when making decisions to adopt or diffuse innovations in the NHS?
  • what is your experience of decision-making in the NHS when it comes to spreading innovation?

Taking part in this survey is voluntary. No personal details will be asked of you in this survey, and published reports about this survey will not contain any personal details

The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

We need your views on how innovation spreads in the NHS

We need your views; complete the DECIDE Survey

Decisions in health Care to Introduce or Diffuse Innovations using Evidence (or DECIDE) is a two year study funded by the Health Foundation to investigate the role of evidence in decisions to introduce innovation. This survey is asking for your views about different types of evidence that are used when making decisions to adopt or diffuse innovations in the NHS.

Innovation in the NHS can take many different forms. It usually involves developing a new idea to meet a health care need. Often innovation may be related to clinical or administrative processes, but it may also involve the development of new medical technologies or clinical tools.

Examples of health care innovations might be information systems, surgical equipment, new drugs and new therapeutic uses for drugs or medical devices. An innovation does not have to be completely novel – for example, you can adopt a service development that is being done elsewhere and it is still an innovation in your organisation and in your local context.

We are interested in your experience of decision-making in the NHS and the kinds of evidence that you prioritise in your decision-making when deciding whether or not to adopt an innovation.

Taking part in this survey is voluntary. No personal details will be asked of you in this survey, and published reports about this survey will not contain any personal details

The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

Is screening for HIV in primary care cost-effective?

Our recently published research on the cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care has caused a great deal of interest and widespread media coverage.

We have produced a BITE sized summary of the paper with the headline findings and links to further information of interest.

The research, published in The Lancet HIV, represents the first time a model to explore the cost effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care has been applied to the UK.

Our data provide the most reliable analyses to date and justify the investment needed to deliver HIV screening in primary care in the 74 localities considered to have high HIV prevalence – essentially most UK metropolitan areas.

Researcher and practicing GP Dr Werner Leber from Queen Mary University London said:
“We’ve shown that HIV screening in UK primary care is cost effective and potentially cost saving, which is contrary to widespread belief. This is an important finding given today’s austerity. Financial pressures, particularly within local authority’s public health budgets, mean that the costs of HIV testing are under intense scrutiny, and in some areas investment in testing has fallen.”