Penny Rapaport

Penny is a Clinical Psychologist in the Division of Psychiatry at UCL. Her PhD focuses upon the development of an evidence-based manualised training intervention to reduce agitation in people with dementia living in care homes, identifying barriers and facilitators to developing and integrating interventions in care homes in order to increase their feasibility and acceptability.

Liz Simes

Liz is the Trial Coordinator for the i-THRIVE evaluation and is responsible for the coordination of the research project.

Liz has experience of quantitative and qualitative data collection, as well as research management and ethical governance in the NHS and criminal justice system. She has coordinated research trials funded by the NIHR for the last three years, evaluating services for young people with Conduct disorder and adults with Antisocial personality disorder. Liz has previously worked as a researcher working with hard to reach groups and is interested in developing evidence based practice for mental health services for young people and adults. Liz has an MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice from King’s College London and will be starting her PhD at UCL in September 2017.

Bethan Morris

Bethan is a research assistant working on the i-THRIVE Evaluation and is involved in the development of research tools and data collection. She has experience of conducting research across mental health services where the aim was to discover mental health professionals’ assessment of patient activation in clinical practice and their receptiveness to a formal measure of patient activation. Her career has also involved working in inpatient settings. Bethan has a BSc in Psychology and an MSc in Mental Health Studies.

Ilse Lee

Ilse is the the Research Officer for the national i-THRIVE programme and has been working on i-THRIVE from the very beginning. Ilse is responsible for managing the i-THRIVE Community of Practice, ensuring that we are aware of how sites are progressing with their i-THRIVE implementation and identifying where support may be needed. She is also responsible for developing the i-THRIVE Toolkit which will help sites to take a structured, evidence-based approach to implementation. Ilse has experience of research in mental health services where the goal has been to assess how the current systems of services are functioning, what is working well and be able to plan what changes should be made to improve efficiency and outcomes for service users. Ilse has recently completed a masters in Cognitive and Decision Sciences at UCL.

“We don’t do dementia” identifying barriers to help-seeking for memory problems among Black African and Caribbean British communities.

CLAHRC researchers have heard first-hand perceptions and beliefs among Black adults that prevent them from approaching their GP when they have concerns about memory problems – an early indicator of dementia.

Focus groups and interviews revealed five main beliefs and perceptions preventing people’s seeking help for dementia:
• Forgetfulness is not indicative of dementia
• Dementia is not an illness affecting Black communities
• Memory problems are not important enough to seek medical help
• Fear of lifestyle changes
• Confidentiality, privacy and family duty

The study comprised semi-structured focus – groups and interviews, recruiting 50 participants across a range of age groups and socioeconomic backgrounds.