How to guide to establish NHS youth forums

Children and young people are a key population for everyone working in the NHS and Public Health. Involving them in commissioning and designing services makes for more appropriate care that’s more likely to be taken up by those who need it

Our ground-breaking diabetes project worked with young people impacted by the condition in east London – we trained young co-inquirers in research skills so they could run community engagement events and analyse feedback on how to improve local diabetes services.

Our work was integral in shaping new NHS “how to” guidance to help commissioners and providers think through and develop youth forums to support person-centred commissioning of children and young people in health and care services.

The ‘how to guide’ is a recipient of the NHS England’s Celebrating Participation in Healthcare grant award scheme and has been authored by the University of East London (UEL)

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Professor Monica Lakhanpaul leads a multi-disciplinary translational research group at UCL, that focuses on Health Services Research which has direct impact on health policy and clinical practice. Her research program aims to take a multi-disciplinary, integrated and collaborative approach to improving outcomes for children. Her research also aims to transform services for patients.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research focuses on the translation of evidence into clinical practice and health policy, drawing together education, primary and secondary research to improve health outcomes for children. Her research crosses primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research falls under four main themes; Applied Translation of Evidence In to Policy and Practice (through systematic review, guideline development, decision and prediction rule development), Improvement Science (with a particular focus on partnership production with parents, patients and health professionals; co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions: MIA study), Conditions (with a specific interest in respiratory illness; asthma, and the acutely sick child) and Inequalities in Health (tailoring interventions for hard to reach groups, health tourism and the use of translators and interpreters to reduce inequalities).

David Law

David Law is the Chief Executive of Hertfordshire Community NHS Trust. He has also worked in primary care and community services in London prior to working in Hertfordshire. He worked in a number of planning roles in health organisations in the County during the 1990s before joining West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust in 2001 as Director of Strategy. In 2004 he was appointed Chief Executive of the Trust, a post he held till 2007.

After leaving West Hertfordshire Hospitals, David worked at Healthcare for London, initially focusing on the organisation of acute services in the capital and then on end of life care.  He worked extensively for the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Before moving to Hertfordshire Community Trust he worked on the Transforming Community Services programme in Lambeth and Southwark and in Tower Hamlets.

NEON project makes the news

Our innovative Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition (NEON) project has made the headlines..in India!. The project is exploring whether a South Asian model proven to promote healthy nutrition in children can “travel” successfully to the UK and help children of Bangladeshi origin in East London.Professor Monica Lakhanpaul is leading the project and spoke to The Goan newspaper about the bi-directional exchange of knowledge that is making a difference in one of London’s less advantaged communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Darren Sharpe

Dr Darren Sharpe is an accomplished Social Scientist with over fifteen year experience in delivering high end research and developing programmes of work spanning health, education, citizenship, welfare, and social care. These include youth engagement projects on behalf of the UK Government and EU, Night Time Economy research funded by the Police and Crime Commissioner for Essex and child protection research on behalf of the Children Commissioner Office in England, as well as media guidelines on the prevention of youth suicide for the EU (i.e. Directorate of Health and Consumers). Darren specialises in participatory research in the development of social and health policy. He is an award winning and highly accomplished academic-activist who has worked tirelessly since 1997 to help improve outcomes for young people who do not have a powerful voice. Dr Sharpe has written widely and been an invited speaker at INVOLVE, Social Service Research Group Association, AYPH and other national and international conferences on a range of socio-political topics affecting young people in Europe and around the world.

Dr Sharpe lectured in the Department of Social Sciences at Nottingham Trent University, Loughborough University and Anglia Ruskin. He has designed and taught modules in Core Sociology, ‘Race’, Culture and Society and in Qualitative Research Methodologies and Methods for doctoral, postgraduate and undergraduate students. He is held in high-esteem by students and colleagues for his teaching, scholarship and research and features in the 2014-15 Anglia Ruskin postgraduate prospectus. What’s more, Dr Sharpe has trained and mentored teachers to conduct action research in the school environment and provided bespoke research skills training to public and third sector employees.

Effectiveness of an implementation optimisation intervention aimed at increasing parent engagement in HENRY, a childhood obesity prevention programme – the Optimising Family Engagement in HENRY (OFTEN) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

A cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention to prevent pneumonia in children under 5 years old in rural Malawi (the Cooking and Pneumonia Study): a cluster randomised controlled trial