Lizette Ahenda

Lizette Ahenda joined in June 2016 to liaise with and involve school students, teachers, adolescent patients and their parents in content development of the intervention. She maintains close collaborations with Centre of the Cell learning team, child health practitioners and other project partners.

Since her BSc from the University of Hertfordshire in 2009, she has previous clinical experience as a Physiotherapist in primary and secondary NHS trusts, as well as from her birth place Nairobi, Kenya, collecting epidemiological data for a government hospital on community based health. Montreal, Canada offered opportunities in rehabilitation of stroke patients, children with motor impairments and YMCA gym programs for long term conditions. While in Montreal, Lizette worked in community outreach with children, youth and families. Here in the UK, she leads activities and mentors at a South London youth club.

Lizette graduated with an MSc in Global Health in 2015 from UCL and has since completed evaluation projects of community health programs in London Borough of Camden, conducted fieldwork for an Institute of Education trial of secondary school emotional health programs, as well as for an EU-MRC trial on men’s health programs for Glasgow University’s Social and Public Health Sciences Unit.

 

A cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention to prevent pneumonia in children under 5 years old in rural Malawi (the Cooking and Pneumonia Study): a cluster randomised controlled trial

Emma Green

Emma  is a student pursuing a PhD titled “An exploration of an asset-based approach to the management of diabetes in young people: a qualitative participatory approach” supervised by Professor Angela Harden and Dr Darren Sharpe. It is embedded in the CLAHRC’s wider project examining the co-design of community-based services responsive to the needs of children and young people, which involves young people in all stages of the research process.

Jennifer Martin

Jennifer has a BSc hons in Human Biology, Sociology and Psychology and an MSc from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has a background in non-clinical public health with experience working in Nepal and Zimbabwe. She is part of the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition team based at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. Her PhD is exploring the Reverse translation of the women’s groups using the Participatory Learning and Action Cycle from resource-limited setting to the UK. She will be adapting this model to address infant nutrition in the Bangladeshi population of Tower Hamlets, east London.

Using a co-production prioritization exercise involving South Asian children, young people and their families to identify health priorities requiring further research and public awareness

Prof Jonathan Grigg

Professor Jonathan Grigg is one of the UK’s top paediatricians and an international leader in paediatric respiratory research. Since 2003, he has obtained over £11M in research grants as PI and co-applicant from MRC, NIHR, DH and charities. These funds supported air pollution and asthma research with national and international impact. He is the lead paediatrician for government advice on air pollution and children’s health as a member of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, and provides ad hoc advice on respiratory toxicity to the Committee on Carcinogens. He co-chairs the Royal College of Physicians Committee into “air pollution throughout the life course”. In leading the national paediatric research agenda, he organises all paediatric input into British Thoracic Society’s meetings, and as elected secretary to the Royal College Paediatrics and Child Health’s Academic Board, organises its Annual Meeting. He develops national research priorities in paediatric respiratory medicine as Chair of the British Paediatric Respiratory Society, ex chair and, now member, of the Clinical Study Group (Respiratory) for the Medicines for Children network, NIHR Programme Grant Experts Panel. He leads on paediatric respiratory infection and immunology as elected chair of this group in the European Respiratory Society. Nationally, he evaluates the cost effectiveness of therapies, as the paediatric lead of NICE Appraisal Panel A, and is an RCPCH-appointed expert adviser on asthma therapies to other appraisal panels. Locally, he leads on paediatric non-medicines research in NE London as regional LCRN representative to the national committee, and supports academic training as the RCPCH regional academic advisor.

New funding success

Professor Lakhanpaul (pictured above third from left) is one of three international collaborations based at UCL to receive Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) awards, in recognition of research partnerships improving health in low and middle income countries.

Professor Lakhanpaul is Deputy Lead for our Child Health research theme, and leads our NEON study – a participatory female health volunteer led intervention to promote healthy nutrition in children of Bangladeshi origin in East London.

The Professor specialises in integrated community child health and is an international expert in the creation and implementation of guidelines in healthcare, with a track-record of co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions. She combines this with work as practising consultant community paediatrician at Whittington Health.

The innovative partnerships arising from the GCRF awards will focus on optimising infant feeding practices in rural India, using technology to support HIV prevention in South Africa, and shaping future policies for the control of non-communicable diseases around the world.

Professor Lakhanpaul will work with Professor Marie Lall (UCL Institute of Education and Pro-Vice-Provost South Asia) and Dr Priti Parikh (UCL Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering) to develop an integrated health, education and environmental intervention to optimise infant feeding practices through schools and Anganwadi networks in India.

Professor Lakhanpaul said: “We are delighted to be receiving the award to support our research, which builds on the work I have been leading in the UK with the CLAHRC in Tower Hamlets.”