Dr Fiona Hamilton

Fiona is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

I worked as a GP for five years in South London before training in Public Health Medicine. My PhD examined the impact of pay for performance (such as the national Quality & Outcomes Framework) on smoking cessation work in primary care, and alcohol screening and brief intervention, with a focus on inequalities. My current research area is e-Health initiatives to address behaviour change in people with hazardous and harmful alcohol use.

Dr Emma Byrne

Emma is a non-clinical researcher with a background in computer science and health technologies. She uses systems analysis and qualitative methods to analyse and evaluate sociotechnical innovations in healthcare. She is studying the impact of different forms of training and incentives on the prescribing of anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

Marissa Mes

Marissa is a Dutch-Japanese student with a background in Psychology. She completed a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences with a Major in Psychology and a Minor in Statistics at University College Utrecht in the Netherlands.  This was followed by an MSc in Health Psychology (University of Bath) and an internship with the HealthTalk project at the Health Experiences Research Group (University of Oxford). Marissa’s work includes both qualitative and quantitative research. Her research interests include patient experiences of chronic illness, health inequalities, intervention implementation, and public health.

Caroline Katzer

Caroline has completed a BSc in Psychology at University of Mannheim in Germany and an MSc in Health Psychology at University of Surrey. Throughout her undergraduate degree in Mannheim she worked as a Research Assistant in the Judgement and Decision Making lab. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Caroline’s research interests include the development of complex interventions, treatment and illness perceptions in chronically ill patients, adherence to treatment as well as behaviour change in general.

Ruth Plackett

Ruth’s PhD is exploring whether using new educational technologies, such as online simulation, can improve the teaching of clinical reasoning skills for medical students. Ruth, along with her supervisors and medical experts has developed an electronic clinical reasoning educational simulation tool (eCREST). ECREST shows patients in general practice, all patients presenting with vague, non-specific respiratory symptoms, which could be indicative of serious conditions that are often missed in primary, such as lung cancer. This will allow students to practise gathering information from a patient, interpret that information and make informed decisions on diagnosis and management. Ruth is currently conducting a feasibility randomised controlled trial at three medical schools, to see whether it can improve clinical reasoning skills, and a qualitative think aloud interview study, to explore how eCREST can help students to learn clinical reasoning skills. This PhD aims to improve future doctors’ awareness of the presentation of potentially serious conditions, such as lung cancer in primary care, to help reduce future diagnostic errors.

Diarmuid Denneny

Diarmuid Denneny  is spending a year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. His fellowship will allow him to explore allied health professional training to deliver brief psychological interventions for patients with long term conditions, and is linked to the CLAHRC’s Optimising Behaviour and engagement with care theme.

 Diarmuid is  at the pain management centre at University College London Hospitals (UCLH). He has over 20 years clinical experience. He is particularly interested in neuropathic pain, persistent pain and CCBT techniques in pain management, and leads the neuropathic pain pathway including CRPS at the UCLH pain management centre. Diarmuid is a qualified independent prescriber. He is interested in the clinical application of research, and is involved in education and research at UCLH.

Dr John Robson

Longstanding interest in quality improvement and cardiovascular disease
• Chair NICE guideline 2008 on lipids and CVD risk estimation
• Co-author of QRisk and QDiabetes scores
• UCLP and Tower Hamlets CCG CVD lead
• QMUL Clinical Effectiveness Group lead
• Evaluation of the NHS health Check programme
• Support and evaluation with colleagues, of Tower Hamlets managed practice networks that propelled Tower Hamlets CCG from the bottom quintile of performance in 2008 to one of the national top performers in 2013.

Currently working with UCLP across a number of CCGs on quality improvement in atrial fibrillation and other cardiovascular disease. He also supports work with the Clinical Effectiveness Group and its primary care database to develop information systems that support a range of studies in quality improvement including antibiotic prescribing, earlier breast cancer detection, domestic violence, testing for HIV and TB, diabetes and liver disease.

Clinical Effectiveness Group: http://blizard.qmul.ac.uk/ceg-home.html

Professor Elizabeth Murray

Professor Elizabeth Murray is Professor of e-Health and Primary Care at UCL. She established the UCL e-Health Unit in 2003 with a focus on the use of new technologies, such as the Internet, mobile phones and telemedicine, to improve health and health care. The Unit has grown rapidly and has an international reputation for high quality, innovative research.

DIAMOND feasibility randomised controlled trial of a web-based intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in people with hazardous and harmful use versus a face-to-face intervention: protocol