Professor Robert Horne

Prof Rob Horne founded the Centre for Behavioural Medicine at the UCL School of Pharmacy in 2006 and has developed a range of valid and reliable tools to assess patient perspectives of illness and treatments. Over the past decade, his research has generated over 140 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and research grants over £10M (as PI and co-applicant). Rob was designated a Fellow of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in 2010 and was appointed a NIHR Senior Investigator in 2011. In 2012 he was appointed as UCL’s academic lead for the Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation (CASMI), a joint undertaking with the University of Oxford. In 2005/6 he led a scoping exercise commissioned by the NIHR Service Delivery and Organisation (SDO) Programme to produce a conceptual map of compliance, adherence and concordance and to identify priorities for future research. This work formed the basis for the NICE Medicine Adherence Guidelines which he co-authored in 2009. He has also advised the European Parliament, MRC, DoH, NHS and the WHO.

 

Prof Steph Taylor

Stephanie Taylor is Professor in Public Health and Primary Care. Her research interests include complex interventions, chronic disease management and the self management of chronic conditions.

She has led a number of systematic reviews of quantitative research evidence and is currently involved in a number of clinical trials of complex interventions in the community. She is principal investigator on an NIHR programme grant looking at a novel self management intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain (COPERS), and co investigator on a large study of the effect of promoting physical activity on depression amongst residents in residential and nursing homes (OPERA).

Stephanie sits on the NICE Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee. She is an expert advisor on self care of non-communicable diseases to the World Health Organisation.

Taxonomy for the Rehabilitation of Knee Conditions (TRAK), a Digital Intervention to Support the Self-Care Components of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rehabilitation: Protocol of a Feasibility Study

Dr Fiona Hamilton

Fiona is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

I worked as a GP for five years in South London before training in Public Health Medicine. My PhD examined the impact of pay for performance (such as the national Quality & Outcomes Framework) on smoking cessation work in primary care, and alcohol screening and brief intervention, with a focus on inequalities. My current research area is e-Health initiatives to address behaviour change in people with hazardous and harmful alcohol use.

Dr Emma Byrne

Emma is a non-clinical researcher with a background in computer science and health technologies. She uses systems analysis and qualitative methods to analyse and evaluate sociotechnical innovations in healthcare. She is studying the impact of different forms of training and incentives on the prescribing of anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

Marissa Mes

Marissa is a Dutch-Japanese student with a background in Psychology. She completed a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences with a Major in Psychology and a Minor in Statistics at University College Utrecht in the Netherlands.  This was followed by an MSc in Health Psychology (University of Bath) and an internship with the HealthTalk project at the Health Experiences Research Group (University of Oxford). Marissa’s work includes both qualitative and quantitative research. Her research interests include patient experiences of chronic illness, health inequalities, intervention implementation, and public health.

Caroline Katzer

Caroline has completed a BSc in Psychology at University of Mannheim in Germany and an MSc in Health Psychology at University of Surrey. Throughout her undergraduate degree in Mannheim she worked as a Research Assistant in the Judgement and Decision Making lab. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Caroline’s research interests include the development of complex interventions, treatment and illness perceptions in chronically ill patients, adherence to treatment as well as behaviour change in general.