Professor Robert Horne

Prof Rob Horne founded the Centre for Behavioural Medicine at the UCL School of Pharmacy in 2006 and has developed a range of valid and reliable tools to assess patient perspectives of illness and treatments. Over the past decade, his research has generated over 140 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and research grants over £10M (as PI and co-applicant). Rob was designated a Fellow of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in 2010 and was appointed a NIHR Senior Investigator in 2011. In 2012 he was appointed as UCL’s academic lead for the Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation (CASMI), a joint undertaking with the University of Oxford. In 2005/6 he led a scoping exercise commissioned by the NIHR Service Delivery and Organisation (SDO) Programme to produce a conceptual map of compliance, adherence and concordance and to identify priorities for future research. This work formed the basis for the NICE Medicine Adherence Guidelines which he co-authored in 2009. He has also advised the European Parliament, MRC, DoH, NHS and the WHO.

 

Prof Steph Taylor

Stephanie Taylor is Professor in Public Health and Primary Care. Her research interests include complex interventions, chronic disease management and the self management of chronic conditions.

She has led a number of systematic reviews of quantitative research evidence and is currently involved in a number of clinical trials of complex interventions in the community. She is principal investigator on an NIHR programme grant looking at a novel self management intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain (COPERS), and co investigator on a large study of the effect of promoting physical activity on depression amongst residents in residential and nursing homes (OPERA).

Stephanie sits on the NICE Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee. She is an expert advisor on self care of non-communicable diseases to the World Health Organisation.

Jo Hornby

Jo is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

Prior to joining the e-Health Unit, I was a Clinical Project Manager involved in the management of a cell therapy trial with Cell Therapy Catapult at Guy’s Hospital. Previously I was a Clinical Trial Agreements Associate at Kings Health Partners Clinical Trial Office and worked at several large pharmaceutical companies as a Clinical Project Manager. I have experience in Phase I to IV clinical trials covering the therapeutic areas of anti-infectives, osteoporosis, oncology, cardiovascular and diabetes. I have a PhD in Biotechnology and BSc Microbiology (Hons).

Dr Fiona Hamilton

Fiona is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

I worked as a GP for five years in South London before training in Public Health Medicine. My PhD examined the impact of pay for performance (such as the national Quality & Outcomes Framework) on smoking cessation work in primary care, and alcohol screening and brief intervention, with a focus on inequalities. My current research area is e-Health initiatives to address behaviour change in people with hazardous and harmful alcohol use.

Dr Emma Byrne

Emma is a non-clinical researcher with a background in computer science and health technologies. She uses systems analysis and qualitative methods to analyse and evaluate sociotechnical innovations in healthcare. She is studying the impact of different forms of training and incentives on the prescribing of anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

Dr John Robson

Longstanding interest in quality improvement and cardiovascular disease
• Chair NICE guideline 2008 on lipids and CVD risk estimation
• Co-author of QRisk and QDiabetes scores
• UCLP and Tower Hamlets CCG CVD lead
• QMUL Clinical Effectiveness Group lead
• Evaluation of the NHS health Check programme
• Support and evaluation with colleagues, of Tower Hamlets managed practice networks that propelled Tower Hamlets CCG from the bottom quintile of performance in 2008 to one of the national top performers in 2013.

Currently working with UCLP across a number of CCGs on quality improvement in atrial fibrillation and other cardiovascular disease. He also supports work with the Clinical Effectiveness Group and its primary care database to develop information systems that support a range of studies in quality improvement including antibiotic prescribing, earlier breast cancer detection, domestic violence, testing for HIV and TB, diabetes and liver disease.

Clinical Effectiveness Group: http://blizard.qmul.ac.uk/ceg-home.html

Professor Elizabeth Murray

Professor Elizabeth Murray is Professor of e-Health and Primary Care at UCL. She established the UCL e-Health Unit in 2003 with a focus on the use of new technologies, such as the Internet, mobile phones and telemedicine, to improve health and health care. The Unit has grown rapidly and has an international reputation for high quality, innovative research.