Catherine Lawrence

Catherine Lawrence is the Team Lead Physiotherapist in Critical Care at University College London Hospital and is spending one year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. Catherine has a keen interest in early rehabilitation on critical care and the management of patient’s who require prolonged critical care admission.  Catherine’s research will explore the barriers to early rehabilitation on critical care.

Catherine obtained a BSc (hons) degree in Physiotherapy at Brunel University in 2010. She then went on to complete a Master of Research Degree (MRes) in Clinical Research at City, University of London. Catherine’s MRes project was focused on exploring the relationship between patient motivation and adherence to rehabilitation on critical care. Catherine is hoping to further expand on this work during her fellowship.

CLAHRC widens access to training by switching learning online

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

How can training in research methods for front-line NHS and public health staff be made more accessible and convenient? How do you translate a face-to-face course to an online learning resource?

Dr Helen Barratt (Deputy Director of the CLAHRC Academy) shared her experience of taking a successful face-to-face course and transforming it fully online and this work has been featured in a case study by the UCL Life Learning team entitled Translating a face-to-face course online

Our North Thames geography, plus work and time pressures faced by staff on the front line of health and health care meant that not everyone interested in our popular Introduction to Evaluation course could access our regular programme held in Central London.

In the case study Dr Barratt discusses the unique challenges of preparing and delivering online learning using digital platforms and educational tools, and provides handy tips for educators approaching similar work.

Marissa Mes

Marissa is a Dutch-Japanese student with a background in Psychology. She completed a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences with a Major in Psychology and a Minor in Statistics at University College Utrecht in the Netherlands.  This was followed by an MSc in Health Psychology (University of Bath) and an internship with the HealthTalk project at the Health Experiences Research Group (University of Oxford). Marissa’s work includes both qualitative and quantitative research. Her research interests include patient experiences of chronic illness, health inequalities, intervention implementation, and public health.

Caroline Katzer

Caroline has completed a BSc in Psychology at University of Mannheim in Germany and an MSc in Health Psychology at University of Surrey. Throughout her undergraduate degree in Mannheim she worked as a Research Assistant in the Judgement and Decision Making lab. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Caroline’s research interests include the development of complex interventions, treatment and illness perceptions in chronically ill patients, adherence to treatment as well as behaviour change in general.

Ruth Plackett

Ruth’s PhD is exploring whether using new educational technologies, such as online simulation, can improve the teaching of clinical reasoning skills for medical students. Ruth, along with her supervisors and medical experts has developed an electronic clinical reasoning educational simulation tool (eCREST). ECREST shows patients in general practice, all patients presenting with vague, non-specific respiratory symptoms, which could be indicative of serious conditions that are often missed in primary, such as lung cancer. This will allow students to practise gathering information from a patient, interpret that information and make informed decisions on diagnosis and management. Ruth is currently conducting a feasibility randomised controlled trial at three medical schools, to see whether it can improve clinical reasoning skills, and a qualitative think aloud interview study, to explore how eCREST can help students to learn clinical reasoning skills. This PhD aims to improve future doctors’ awareness of the presentation of potentially serious conditions, such as lung cancer in primary care, to help reduce future diagnostic errors.

Diarmuid Denneny

Diarmuid Denneny  is spending a year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow. His fellowship will allow him to explore allied health professional training to deliver brief psychological interventions for patients with long term conditions, and is linked to the CLAHRC’s Optimising Behaviour and engagement with care theme.

 Diarmuid is  at the pain management centre at University College London Hospitals (UCLH). He has over 20 years clinical experience. He is particularly interested in neuropathic pain, persistent pain and CCBT techniques in pain management, and leads the neuropathic pain pathway including CRPS at the UCLH pain management centre. Diarmuid is a qualified independent prescriber. He is interested in the clinical application of research, and is involved in education and research at UCLH.

Harry De Jesus

Harry is CLAHRC Research Fellow and a Senior Research Nurse working for the North Thames Clinical Research Network. His clinical background is in paediatric/neonatal intensive care and clinical research. He completed his BSc in Nursing with magna cum laude honours from the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines. He has completed an MRes in Clinical Practice and was awarded a distinction for his thesis on self management of children with IBD. As part of his dissemination of his results, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America awarded him a conference grant to present his poster on the American Advances in IBD conference.

Harry’s passion is to use participatory methodologies that listens to children’s voices using developmentally appropriate interview methods. Currently, he is spending a year on developing a PhD proposal investigating paediatric fatigue among young people with IBD.

Lucie Hogger

Lucie Hogger is Clinical Lead Speech and Language Therapist at Whittington Health and working with adults with acquired communication and swallowing disorders. She is spending one year as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL pre-doctoral fellow exploring the interactions between people living with dementia who take multiple medications and their health care professionals as part of the APOLLO-MM project http://www.polypharmacy.org.uk/.

Lucie has 10 years of experience working in the NHS and completed an MSc in Neuroscience and Communication at UCL in 2017. Her interests are in discourse analysis, neurological disorders and rehabilitation.