Registration now open! Introduction to Evaluation Workshop – 13 December 2017

The NIHR CLAHRC North Thames Academy is now accepting applications for the next instalment of our one-day, hands-on Introduction to Evaluation workshop on Wednesday 13 December 2017.

This popular short course provides an overview to the evaluation process, complete with practical examples and useful tips for conducting your own evaluation. Aimed at frontline healthcare and public health staff, this introductory level course is ideal if you are planning your first evaluation within your service.

To read more details about the course, and to download the registration form:

visit the event page here

 

Previous attendees of this course have told us:

“Very useful – will be able to disseminate to team. Planning of projects more of a priority now. Great organisation – many thanks.”

“Good introduction to concepts of evaluation and research. ” 

“The course was extremely well organised, with incredibly knowledgeable speakers, very good session!”

Registration is open until 5pm, 6th October 2017. Our short courses are free for staff working within our partner organisations. If you have any questions about the course, or would like to be added to our mailing list, please send us an email at clahrc.academy@ucl.ac.uk.

Congratulations to CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow Pinkie Chambers

Pinkie Chambers, a senior pharmacist at UCLH and former CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow is celebrating success in securing a prestigious NIHR Fellowship award.

After spending a year with the CLAHRC to hone her research skills, and against stiff competition, Pinkie secured a Doctoral Research Fellowship (DRF), which offers 3 years full-time funding (or 4 or 5 years part-time) to undertake a PhD.

The DRF is aimed at individuals, of outstanding potential, early in their research careers.

The Fellowship scheme aims to fast-track them through a customised research training programme in an environment reflecting their individual talents and training needs.

It is anticipated that successful applicants would become independent research leaders within 6 to 10 years of completing the DRF award.

During her year with us as a CLAHRC/HEE NCEL Fellow Pinkie developed her skills and worked on her application to the NIHR.

Her areas of interest include improving the chemotherapy pathway for cancer patients, and supporting patients to self-administer some of their blood tests to avoid hospital visits.

As well as her work as a Senior pharmacist at UCLH, Pinkie is also Joint Chair of the London Cancer Chemotherapy Expert Reference Group.

In particular Pinkie was commended by the NIHR for her efforts to involve patients and the public in her work which were described as “exceptional” – thanks in no small part to the CLAHRC’ Research Advisory Panel who Pinkie worked with during her CLAHRC/HEE NCEL Fellowship and who she presented to twice.

Read more about Pinkie’s time with us here

Our congratulations to Pinkie and best wishes for her future career

Introduction to Economic Evaluation Workshop – 8 November – Apply Now!

We are pleased to announce that our popular Introduction to Economic Evaluation Workshop will be running again on Wednesday 8 November 2017, and applications are now being accepted – click here to read more.

Aimed at staff from the NHS, Local Authorities, and CCGs, this short course provides an introduction to conducting an economic evaluation of a local service. Led by a team of expereinced Health Economists from the Department of Applied Health, UCL, tutors will help you to plan your economic evaluation and identify any potential challenges and their solutions.

 

Previous participants said…

“Important for the current NHS situation. All NHS staff should understand about health economics”

“Really engaging, informative and approachable”

“Very comprehensive course and very high level of subject knowledge in the teaching team”

“Helpful on lots of levels, regardless of previous experience“

“Really helpful introduction to concepts and will really help with own project”

Registration is now open until 5pm, Wednesday 30 August 2017- visit the course page to find out more information and to download an application form. Alternatively, if you have any questions about the course or the CLAHRC North Thames Academy, please get in touch with us at CLAHRC.Academy@ucl.ac.uk.

Quality of life in dementia: do staff and family share the same beliefs in care homes?

Sarah Robertson is a PhD student with funding from the NIHR Collaborations in Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care. Sarah is currently supervised by Professor Gill Livingston, Dr Claudia Cooper & Dr Juanita Hoe.

The MARQUE project

In 2012, the UK government announced that in the face of “one of the biggest health challenges ever” that it was time to “fight back” against dementia. In response, the ESRC & NIHR pledged £9 million towards “Improving Dementia Care”. One of the projects funded by this initiative is the Managing Agitation Raising Quality of LifE (MARQUE) project at UCL led by Professor Gill Livingston. MARQUE began in 2014 and aims to improve our understanding of agitation in care homes and improve the quality of life of people with dementia. Sarah has been working as part of the MARQUE team at UCL and this work inspired her thesis comparing the perspective of paid and family carers in quality of life.

Proxy rated quality of life

Measuring quality of life in dementia presents unique challenges. With the stakes so high, it is important that we understand what we are actually measuring to know whether our interventions to enable people to live well are successful. Many people with dementia in care homes cannot provide ratings on their own quality of life so we rely on the perspectives of people close to them. We call these proxy reports. These reports differ to self-reported quality which has raised questions about the validity of this outcome. However, we do not know how staff and family proxy reports compare.

How do staff and family ratings compare?

MARQUE collected the perspectives of both staff proxies and family proxies from 86 care homes across England; providing 1,054 pairs of proxy ratings in the largest sample to date. For the first time, we used mixed method to explore staff and family ratings.

Our results suggest that staff and family proxies think differently about the quality of life of the same individual with dementia. Quantitative data from this study reveals that staff generally perceive the quality of life as better than family. Staff and family are affected by their own understandings of dementia and their experiences with care. Staff often viewed quality of life as synonymous with quality of care, whereas, family were more influenced by their past experiences.

Many relatives found that the person with dementia had changed. For some, this change centred on loss which they felt evidenced a poor quality of life. Other relatives felt that quality of life is simply not possible living in a care home. Transitioning into a care home is not only stressful at the time, it may leave a lasting impact on how relatives view the quality of life of a person with dementia in the future. Relatives need support to think about how the person with dementia feels in the present moment, focusing on their enjoyment of life with an acceptance of the current situation. Better communication and transparency in care routines helped facilitate relative involvement within care homes, establishing trust which improved perceived quality of life and reduced family carer stress.

What does this mean for dementia research?

  • Proxy reports provide valid measures of perceived quality of life.
  • Proxy raters are influenced by their own context and experiences.
  • Proxy ratings by different raters cannot be used interchangeably.
  • Different proxy ratings may be differently sensitive to interventions.
  • The different opinions of all key stakeholders should be considered.

What does this mean for clinical practice?

  • Within care homes, there are context specific factors that influence resident quality of life.
  • Psychological interventions that target loss, focus on acceptance and enable proxies to find meaning could improve perceived quality of life.
  • Improving the relationship between staff & family could improve perceived quality of life.
  • There may a link between perceived quality of life and carer quality of life.

 Contact –      Email: sarah.robertson@ucl.ac.uk                  Twitter: @1SarahMae, @MARQUEproject                

New short course for 2017! Becoming Research Active

Our CLAHRC Academy is running a new short course in 2017, in collaboration with the Research Design Service London (east London arm) and Clinical Research Network North Thames.

Held on Thursday 12 October 2017, Becoming Research Active – what does it involve and where do I start? is an introductory level course for nurses, allied health professionals, public health and local government members of staff who are interested in research.

As a first step towards becoming “research active”, by the end of the course attendees will be able to understand the research process and will have produced an action plan for taking their research idea forward.

For more details on the workshop, including how to apply,

please visit our events page.

 

Registration now open! Introduction to Demand, Capacity and Flow

Registration for our next CLAHRC North Thames Academy short course, Introduction to Demand, Capacity and Flow, is now open!

Aimed at staff from NHS Trusts, CCGs and Local Authorities, this hands-on, one-day workshop may be for you if you are interested in learning more about:

  • What we mean by demand, capacity and flow

  • The role of variability in demand forecasting and capacity planning

  • How these concepts relate to flow within and between organisations

  • Common pitfalls including the role and limitations of using historical data

  • Some useful rules of thumb from ‘queueing theory’

  • Practical skills and tips for applying these concepts within your own organisations

Date: Tuesday 26 September 2017

Time: 10:00 – 16:00

Venue: Woburn House, 20-24 Tavistock Place, Central London

For more details on the workshop, including how to apply, please see the event page here.

 

 

Introduction to Evaluation Workshop – June 2017

The CLAHRC Academy held its latest installment of the popular Introduction to Evaluation workshop on Tuesday 13 June.

 

With 28 delegates from a wide range of NHS Trusts, Local Authorities and CCGs, there was in-depth discussion and engagement around all aspects of the evaluation process.

Throughout the day, delegates applied what they had learnt to create their own plans for service evaluations, and shared ideas and experiences with tutors and each other.

A few comments from our participants:

Vey engaging, I particularly enjoyed/liked the exercises after each session.”

A good comprehnsive overview of evaluation technniques“.

Very professional & informative. Useful & applicable to the work I do.”

Thank you to all those who attended – your engaged participation made for a very interesting workshop.

Interested in attending this course? We will be running the Introduction to Evaluation workshop again on 13 December 2017: click here for details.

Want to keep up to date with news on our upcoming courses? Email us at at Clahrc.academy@ucl.ac.uk to be added to our mailing list.