Jo Hornby

Jo is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

Prior to joining the e-Health Unit, I was a Clinical Project Manager involved in the management of a cell therapy trial with Cell Therapy Catapult at Guy’s Hospital. Previously I was a Clinical Trial Agreements Associate at Kings Health Partners Clinical Trial Office and worked at several large pharmaceutical companies as a Clinical Project Manager. I have experience in Phase I to IV clinical trials covering the therapeutic areas of anti-infectives, osteoporosis, oncology, cardiovascular and diabetes. I have a PhD in Biotechnology and BSc Microbiology (Hons).

Dr Fiona Hamilton

Fiona is currently working on the Digital Alcohol Management on Demand (DIAMOND) feasibility trial comparing face to face alcohol treatment with supported access to web based treatment for hazardous or harmful drinkers.

I worked as a GP for five years in South London before training in Public Health Medicine. My PhD examined the impact of pay for performance (such as the national Quality & Outcomes Framework) on smoking cessation work in primary care, and alcohol screening and brief intervention, with a focus on inequalities. My current research area is e-Health initiatives to address behaviour change in people with hazardous and harmful alcohol use.

Dr Emma Byrne

Emma is a non-clinical researcher with a background in computer science and health technologies. She uses systems analysis and qualitative methods to analyse and evaluate sociotechnical innovations in healthcare. She is studying the impact of different forms of training and incentives on the prescribing of anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

Dr Lorelei Jones

I am an anthropologist with interests in organisations, professions and expertise. My doctoral research was on the politics of hospital planning in England. My current work is looking at the role of boards in quality improvement in hospitals. I am co-convener of the London Medical Sociology Group and a member of the Society for Studies in Organizing Healthcare.

Marissa Mes

Marissa is a Dutch-Japanese student with a background in Psychology. She completed a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences with a Major in Psychology and a Minor in Statistics at University College Utrecht in the Netherlands.  This was followed by an MSc in Health Psychology (University of Bath) and an internship with the HealthTalk project at the Health Experiences Research Group (University of Oxford). Marissa’s work includes both qualitative and quantitative research. Her research interests include patient experiences of chronic illness, health inequalities, intervention implementation, and public health.

Caroline Katzer

Caroline has completed a BSc in Psychology at University of Mannheim in Germany and an MSc in Health Psychology at University of Surrey. Throughout her undergraduate degree in Mannheim she worked as a Research Assistant in the Judgement and Decision Making lab. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Caroline’s research interests include the development of complex interventions, treatment and illness perceptions in chronically ill patients, adherence to treatment as well as behaviour change in general.

Ruth Plackett

Ruth’s PhD is exploring whether using new educational technologies, such as online simulation, can improve the teaching of clinical reasoning skills for medical students. Ruth, along with her supervisors and medical experts has developed an electronic clinical reasoning educational simulation tool (eCREST). ECREST shows patients in general practice, all patients presenting with vague, non-specific respiratory symptoms, which could be indicative of serious conditions that are often missed in primary, such as lung cancer. This will allow students to practise gathering information from a patient, interpret that information and make informed decisions on diagnosis and management. Ruth is currently conducting a feasibility randomised controlled trial at three medical schools, to see whether it can improve clinical reasoning skills, and a qualitative think aloud interview study, to explore how eCREST can help students to learn clinical reasoning skills. This PhD aims to improve future doctors’ awareness of the presentation of potentially serious conditions, such as lung cancer in primary care, to help reduce future diagnostic errors.

Professor Miranda Wolpert

Professor Miranda Wolpert MBE

A clinical psychologist by background, Professor Miranda Wolpert is committed to understanding how best to support and evaluate effective service delivery to promote resilience and meet children and young people’s mental health needs. Her work focuses on improvement and prevention science combined with social entrepreneurship, and includes the development of online, digital and face-to-face tools and training resources for young people, carers and practitioners.

Miranda is Professor in Evidence Based Practice and Research at UCL and Founder and Director of the Evidence Based Practice Unit (EBPU), a service development and academic unit which works to bridge research and practice in child mental health and is part of both UCL and the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families. She is also Co-Founder and Director of the Child Outcomes Research Consortium (CORC), the UK’s leading membership organisation that collects and uses evidence to improve children and young people’s wellbeing. Miranda is also Director of the Innovation, Evaluation and Dissemination Programme at Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families.

In her other roles, Miranda is National Informatics and Data Advisor on Child and Adolescent Mental Health for NHS England, Children and Young People Mental Health Advisor at UCL Partners and co-chairs the Department of Health group on measurement in child mental health. She is also the Mental Health Strand Lead for the Children’s Policy Research Unit which advises Government on research related to policy development.

In 2017, Miranda was awarded an MBE for founding EBPU, co-founding CORC and services to child and adolescent mental health.

 

Professor Sonia Johnson

Professor Johnson’s research interests are in the clinical and social needs and the treatment outcomes of people with significant mental health problems such as psychosis and bipolar disorder. Professor Johnson is a Principal Investigator in the CLAHRC’s mental health theme working on a project to develop and test a self-management smartphone app for early psychosis.