Dr Sofia Llahana

Dr Sofia Llahana spent a year with us as a CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow. Sofia is a Consultant nurse in Endocrinology at UCLH and her research focused on developing an eHealth intervention to help pituitary patients to mange their condition and care.

Dr Llahana RGN; BSc(Hons); MSc; DNSc obtained her BSc(Hons) Nursing from Athens University, and her MSc in Advanced Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Science from the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland. She has worked as staff nurse and ward manager in Greece, as a clinical Nurse Specialist in Diabetes and Endocrinology and is currently a consultant nurse in endocrinology at University College Hospital. She has also worked as a Research Nurse and Senior Teaching Fellow at Warwick Medical School, where she still maintains an honorary contract. Sofia is Chair of the European Society for Endocrinology (ESE) Nurse Working Group.

Professor Martin Utley

Professor Utley has experience of working on a wide variety of problems in health and health care, spanning many clinical areas. He is committed to assisting those planning, delivering or evaluating health services by developing, adapting and applying operational research techniques. Martin also acts as scientific advisor to the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) and is editor of the journal Operations Research for Health Care.

Vari Wileman

Vari has a PhD in Health Psychology and is experienced in applying psychological methods to the study of behaviour relevant to health, illness and health care. Her particular interest lies in psychological factors associated with treatment non-adherence and acceptance in long-term conditions and has specific knowledge of developing psychological theory-based interventions and in conducting and evaluating psychological intervention randomised controlled trials. Joining UCL, Vari supports the Optimising Behaviour and Engagement with Care theme: Improving adherence to essential medication for asthma: feasibility study and development of the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Approach’ Intervention. She also is working on the Tandem project with QMUL, a tailored, psychological intervention for mild to moderate anxiety or depression in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD).

Samantha Machen

Samantha completed an undergraduate Masters of Nursing Science (MNurSci) degree at the University of Nottingham before working as qualified Intensive Care nurse at the East Midlands Major Trauma Centre in Nottingham. She later completed a MSc at The London School of Economics and Political Science in International Health Policy before joining UCL for her PhD. Her research interests include patient safety, specifically avoidable harm, quality improvement and the role of external and internal governance systems- having previously worked with the Care Quality Commission as an Inspector of NHS Trusts in the UK.

Project Summary

This PhD aims to carry out observational research on wards to ascertain the attitudes and cultures of safety in regards to medicines safety. The methods will be ethnographic in nature, involving spending an extended period of time in each clinical setting to acquire a detailed understanding of the tacit conventions and social relations practiced within and between different professional communities that constitute different ‘safety cultures’. In each setting, non-participant observations and formal and informal interviews will be used to study the everyday practice of medication safety and develop ideas for the intervention in consultation with healthcare professionals. Different settings within the hospital will be studied (for example surgery, admissions areas and intensive care) to ascertain the importance of ward culture upon safety cultures and medicines safety.

Dr Natalia Lewis

Dr Natalia Lewis is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, QMUL. She was trained as a physician and completed her PhD at the North-Western State Medical University, Russian Federation, investigating prevalence and associations of domestic violence and abuse among women patients attending Russian general practice. Her post-doc projects included longitudinal analysis of HPA axis functioning in abused women (CEASE study), evaluation of a training intervention for general practice on domestic violence and child safeguarding (RESPONDS study) and review of grey literature on interventions for children exposed to domestic violence and abuse (IMPROVE study). She is a member of the IRIS/ CLAHRC research team working on post-implementation evaluation of IRIS intervention in five northeast London boroughs (http://www.clahrc-norththames.nihr.ac.uk/iris/).