Evaluating a digitally-enabled care pathway for Acute Kidney Injury

A new publication highlights our work in evaluating a new patient pathway with the potential to provide clinicians with real-time data on inpatients at risk of Acute Kidney Injury.

AKI is common (affecting up to 20% of UK acute hospital admissions);  associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and expensive – excess costs to the NHS in England alone may exceed £1 billion per year.

Researchers at the Royal Free Hospital (RFH), part of London’s Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (RFLFT) have developed a digitally-enabled care pathway for inpatients, incorporating  a mobile software application – the “Streams-AKI” app – that “reads” routinely collected serum creatinine data in hospital inpatients and alerts health professionals where a patient is at risk of AKI.

We have published our protocol for this evaluation, and a postcard-style “need to know” summary – or BITE – of our research plans. We’ll measure its success for patients (in terms of speed and effectiveness of their diagnosis and care), NHS staff and clinicians (to find out what they think of the pathway) and for the NHS in terms of patients’ length of stay and costs to the service.

The protocol and BITE will interest NHS staff and clinicians working in renal care, as well as those interested in the potential of technology to improve detection and diagnosis via routinely collected data

Nehla Djellouli

Nehla is aligned to our Systems and Models theme. Her PhD is entitled Developing Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) in Large-Scale Change. The research will use qualitative methods to identify ways to improve processes to involve patients and the public in decisions about major service change and to evaluate the effectiveness of PPI in the context of large-scale change.

Dr Alistair Connell

Ali qualified as a doctor in 2010. After completing his Core Medical Training in August 2014, he was appointed Clinical Fellow at the UCL Institute for Human Health and Performance, joining a project using large datasets to predict patient decline in hospital. Under the supervision of Prof Hugh Montgomery and Prof Rosalind Raine, he has now started a PhD examining the effects of the implementation of a digitally-enabled care pathway for patients with Acute Kidney Injury. His clinical interests include nephrology and critical care.

Sarah Beardon

Before starting her PhD research, Sarah worked for the UCL Centre for Access to Justice undertaking a research project with the UCL integrated Legal Advice Clinic. This work focussed on the connections between legal problems and health, and included conducting a mixed methods evaluation exploring potential health impacts of legal advice and the experience of collaborative working between healthcare and legal advice services.

Previously, Sarah worked for the Patient Experience Research Centre at Imperial College London, where her projects included questionnaire development and testing, analysis of patient feedback (quantitative and qualitative) and systematic reviews. She has also worked at Cancer Research UK in the Statistical Information team, producing analysis to support the charity’s communications work.

Sarah graduated with a first class honours in Biology (BSc) followed by a Masters in Public Health (MPH). Her research uses mixed methodology and she has a particular interest in health inequalities and social determinants of health.