CLAHRC PhD student Ryan Palmer enjoys success at the Health Services Research UK conference

CLAHRC PhD student Ryan Palmer enjoyed success at the recent prestigious Health Services Research UK conference in Nottingham.

Ryan (pictured above) is a Health Foundation Improvement Science PhD Student working under the primary supervision of Professor Martin Utley.

His research, part of our Methodological Innovation theme, focuses on patient flow between community and hospital services and he won one of the runner up prizes for best oral presentation held at the conference, which brings together researchers and NHS organisations, alongside third sector bodies, professional groups and private sector associates.

Ryan’s poster (below) and oral presentation focused on patient flow within community healthcare.

Ryan is based at one of our CLAHRC partner organisations – North East London NHS foundation Trust – where is he is helping the Trusts leaders and managers model patient flow and referral patterns so they can better design and plan services.

Helping the NHS visualise complex referral data

The NHS generates huge amounts of data but using it to track patient flow and pathways of care requires sophisticated mathematical modelling. CLAHRC PhD student, Ryan Palmer, is “embedded” within one of our partner organisations – North East London Foundation Trust (NELFT) – where part of his work involves offering support and guidance to managers and staff interested in getting the most out of the data they routinely collect.

An example of Ryan’s visualisation of referral patterns between hospital and community services in a busy NHS Trust.

Ryan ran a successful workshop hosted by our research partners NELFT training healthcare professionals how to use network mapping methods for understanding referral data in community healthcare. Care leads who attended came from a range of healthcare disciplines and services, including paediatrics, adult physical health, mental health services and social care.

The two-hour session involved: how to prepare data, how to create network diagrams and the beginnings of discussions as to how these methods may be used to inform service planning. Interest was generated during the session, with many realising the benefits of these methods.

Visualising referral data helps researchers and care managers to work together and understand otherwise overwhelming and hard to interpret data for complex systems. These network maps highlight important characteristics of referral activity and can help identify services that exhibit interesting dynamics. Sharing this work with healthcare professionals, they helped to stimulate further conversations around the analysis and organisation of referrals in community healthcare services.

Our collaborators are currently seeking to implement a single point access (SPA) for older adult community services. This session formed part of the ongoing work with our collaborators to help inform their thinking in designing this SPA.

Photograph selected in competition for UCL India Voices poster

Congratulations go out to Jennifer Martin, who has had an image she took in India chosen to represent the UCL India Voices project in 2017.

A PhD student with the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition (NEON) project, Jennifer took the picture while conducting research with women in Mumbai. After submitting it to a UCL photography competition, Jennifer’s photograph was selected as the image for UCL India Voices poster.

Advertising UCL’s Grand Challenge of Cultural Understanding India Voices cross-disciplinary programme of film, debate and the arts, the poster can be seen across UCL.

Details of the India Voices programme can be found on the UCL Grand Challenges website.

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Professor Monica Lakhanpaul leads a multi-disciplinary translational research group at UCL, that focuses on Health Services Research which has direct impact on health policy and clinical practice. Her research program aims to take a multi-disciplinary, integrated and collaborative approach to improving outcomes for children. Her research also aims to transform services for patients.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research focuses on the translation of evidence into clinical practice and health policy, drawing together education, primary and secondary research to improve health outcomes for children. Her research crosses primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research falls under four main themes; Applied Translation of Evidence In to Policy and Practice (through systematic review, guideline development, decision and prediction rule development), Improvement Science (with a particular focus on partnership production with parents, patients and health professionals; co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions: MIA study), Conditions (with a specific interest in respiratory illness; asthma, and the acutely sick child) and Inequalities in Health (tailoring interventions for hard to reach groups, health tourism and the use of translators and interpreters to reduce inequalities).