Introduction to Evaluation Online: 16 April – 13 May 2018

Do you need to demonstrate the impact of projects in your organisation?

Do you want to improve the design and implementation of your programmes?

Are you tasked with carrying out an evaluation, but don’t know where to start?

Consider enrolling in our four-week online course run by the NIHR CLAHRC North Thames Academy to address these challenges. It is aimed at staff in frontline services at NHS Trusts, CCGs and Local Authorities, who have limited experience conducting service evaluations.

After participating in this course, you will have the skills and knowledge to undertake your own evaluation of a local programme or service. Inspired by the content of our popular face-to-face evaluation course, the online course will cover:

  • Different types of evaluation, including their pros and cons

  • How to select suitable methods and approaches for evaluating a local programme or service

  • Practical skills and tips in using evaluation methods and approaches

  • Ways of sharing your evaluation findings to make an impact

Teaching will be delivered entirely online, by expert tutors. You’ll learn by watching videocasts; interacting through activities and questions; and learning from others by taking part in the discussions that accompany each step. You’ll also develop a plan for a real life evaluation you may have to conduct.

Who is this workshop suitable for?

Staff from NHS trusts, local authorities and clinical commissioning groups who need to evaluate local programmes or services as part of their work. The course is not aimed at academics or researchers.

What preparation is needed?

Participants should attend the course with an evaluation in mind that they may have to carry out.  No previous knowledge of evaluation is required, or experience of study design and statistics.

Participants will receive a certificate of completion if they undertake at least 80% of the course activities.

Dates – Monday 16 April – Sunday 13 May 2018.

Learning hours 3 hours per week (12 hours in total)

Cost – £100 for staff working in NIHR CLAHRC North Thames partner organisations (please click here to see a list of our partners). There is a delegate fee of £250 for other attendees.

Registration – Registration will open in February 2018, when an application form will be available here. Applications will be selected to ensure a diverse range of participants.

Please note, a cancellation fee of £100 will be charged to both partner and non-partner delegates in the event of non-attendance without notice after 5pm, Sunday 8th April 2018.

 

For more information, and to be added to our mailing list, please contact clahrc.academy@ucl.ac.uk

Improving NHS orthopaedic care – your views and experience needed

There are big variations in care for people receiving orthopedic services in the NHS –  orthopedics covers conditions involving the musculoskeletal system including hip and knee replacement surgery. We are evaluating the Getting it Right First Time programme – or GIRFT – which aims to improve services and make sure people get more consistent care across the whole NHS.

Part of our evaluation involves asking two sets of people –

i) patients over 60 who have had orthopaedic surgery in the last two years
and
ii) people over 60 

about their views on orthopaedic surgery and improving outcomes.

We’re running focus groups in March

People who have had a hip or knee replacement in a NHS hospital within the last two years Aged over 60
21st March – UCL Farr Institute, 222 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DA

Find out more here

People over 60
19th March – UCL Farr Institute, 222 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DA

Find out more here

 

Conference success for CLAHRC PhD Marissa Mes

CLAHRC North Thames PhD Marissa Mes enjoyed success at the prestigious Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) of the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research (AUK CAR).

Marissa accepts her award from AUKCAR Director Professor Aziz Sheikh

Marissa won best poster presentation when she showcased her work to delegates during the conference (below)  – her research focus is assessing whether pharmacists are a suitable delivery channel for an intervention aimed at asthma patients to improve their adherence to preventer inhalers.

Marissa in action at the ASM

Our congratulations to Marissa on her prize.

Marissa’s fellow CLAHRC PhD Caroline Katzer, who is developing and evaluating an intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in adult asthma patients also showcased her work at the conference via both a poster and an oral presentation, which generated a lot of discussion, and was among those complimented on the quality of her presentations.

 

 

Both PhDs are funded by the CLAHRC and affiliated to AUKCAR.

Top of the charts! Lancet paper on HIV testing most downloaded in 2017

The end of any year sees a number of “best of” charts published and research is no exception!

We’re delighted to report that a paper produced by the CLAHRC’s Dr Werner Leber and Professor Chris Griffiths and others is 2017’s most downloaded in The Lancet HIV. Dr Werner ‘s groundbreaking work represents the first time a model to explore the cost effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care has been applied to the UK.

The work generated great media interest (below) and offers a model to measure cost-effectiveness for commissioners and providers of HIV care.

Read the paper:

Cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care: a health economics modelling analysis
Baggaley, Rebecca F et al.
The Lancet HIV , Volume 4 , Issue 10 , e465 – e474

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30123-6/abstract 

Read the most downloaded list

Read a BITE sized summary of Werner’s work.

 

 

 

Changing behaviour to improve adherence to asthma medication

CLAHRC behaviour change researchers and PhDs Caroline Katzer and Marissa Mes were a big hit at the recent in ESPACOMP conference in Budapest Hungary. Caroline and Marissa presented to an audience of clinicians and allied health professionals interested in adherence

ESPACOMP (European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance and Persistence) promotes science concerned with the assessment of what patients do with medicines they have been prescribed – and the implications when they adhere, or don’t adhere to them. Their 2017 conference brought together behaviour change practitioners and researchers from across the world and both Marissa and Caroline’s presentation generated much interest and a host of questions from the audience.

Both Caroline and Marissa are conducting their PhDs as as part of our wider work examining the effectiveness of  the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Intervention’ (PAPI) in improving adherence to asthma medication.

 

Marissa (above) is investigating the effectiveness of pharmacists as the delivery channel of a theory-based intervention to support medication adherence in adults with asthma.

Caroline is focusing her PhD on developing the PAPI intervention to support adherence to maintenance treatment in adult asthma patients.

Both fielded questions from pharmacists interested in how their research/academic findings were going to be translated into pharmacy practice, and how feasible this would be.