Bart’s Research Centre for Women’s Health is up and running with the EMmY study

We’re delighted to announce our latest research partnership – with the the Bart’s Research Centre for Women’s Health (BARC) .

BARC was launched in June 2017 and is led by Professors Shakila Thangaratinam and Khalid Khan.

The Centre is funded by Barts Charity and based within Queen Mary University of London at the Whitechapel campus.

The centre team (pictured above) will focus on improving the health of mothers and babies in East London, addressing healthcare challenges such as diabetes, obesity and heavy blood loss during childbirth.

The first BARC study is set to start in January 2018 –  “EMmY: Effectiveness and acceptability of myo-inositol nutritional supplement in the prevention of gestational diabetes: a pilot placebo controlled double blind randomised trial”.

EmMY will aim to randomise 200 women who are at risk of developing gestational diabetes, across three sites (Barts Health, Guy’s and St Thomas’, and Central Manchester University NHS Trusts).

Participants will be randomised to receive either 4g of Myo-inositol – a naturally occurring substance produced in the human body that belongs to the vitamin B complex group – or placebo study supplement daily, from the end of the first trimester until delivery.

The pilot will examine rates of recruitment and randomisation to the trial, and rates of adherence to the intervention. Researchers will analyse reasons for participation, non-participation, and non-adherence to the trial protocol. Any preliminary estimates and insight into trial procedures from the EMmY study will then inform a future large-scale trial.

The CLAHRC is supporting the study by providing health economic analysis for the pilot and full trial and assisting with patient and public involvement..

Contact Doris Lanz, BARC Senior Trial Manager for more info at d.lanz@qmul.ac.uk

Exciting new data partnership with Islington launches this month

Islington Council, Islington Clinical Commissioning Group, North East London Commissioning Support Unit, and the CLAHRC,  have been granted an award for a project which aims to create a linked data-set between NHS and a local government data for households across Islington.

Local authorities hold data on their residents in terms of social care, housing, early years settings, education and crime. All of these are important to health: and in turn affected by health.

Linking local government information with health data offers an opportunity to better understand the local population’s combined health and social needs and to improve health and wellbeing in the widest sense across the Borough.

We would be able to answer questions such as:

What are local pattern of health and social risk factors for homelessness at a household level?

How could we best target prevention services and support to households at high risk of homelessness?

The project builds on our close ties to Islington, and is part of the Health Foundation’s Advancing Applied Analytics programme, aimed at improving analytical capability in support of health and care services.

 

 

 

The Health Foundation is an independent charity committed to bringing about better health and health care for people in the UK.

 

Conference success for CLAHRC PhD Marissa Mes

CLAHRC North Thames PhD Marissa Mes enjoyed success at the prestigious Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) of the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research (AUK CAR).

Marissa accepts her award from AUKCAR Director Professor Aziz Sheikh

Marissa won best poster presentation when she showcased her work to delegates during the conference (below)  – her research focus is assessing whether pharmacists are a suitable delivery channel for an intervention aimed at asthma patients to improve their adherence to preventer inhalers.

Marissa in action at the ASM

Our congratulations to Marissa on her prize.

Marissa’s fellow CLAHRC PhD Caroline Katzer, who is developing and evaluating an intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in adult asthma patients also showcased her work at the conference via both a poster and an oral presentation, which generated a lot of discussion, and was among those complimented on the quality of her presentations.

 

 

Both PhDs are funded by the CLAHRC and affiliated to AUKCAR.

The National Institute for Health Research: Improving the health and wealth of the UK through research

A new piece in Open Access Government highlights the scale and scope of the work of our funder the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

In its role as the “research arm of the NHS” the NIHR’s mission is to improve both the health and wealth of the UK by means of research. A piece by Jonathan Miles (Editor, Open Access Government) gives a great overview of the work of the NIHR, and how it works with charities, industry and other sectors.

There are also a couple of examples of the groundbreaking and impactful research funded by the NIHR and the difference it is making – read the piece below.

Making Specialing Special – Conference on Enhanced Therapeutic 1:1 Nursing Care

CLAHRC researcher Dr Victoria Wood is among those presenting at an upcoming conference on “nurse specialing” – the continuous presence of a member of the nursing team for a single patient. Registration is now open for the event on Friday February 9th, hosted by our partners at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Some patients admitted to hospitals may have increased confusion, delirium, and dementia or be at risk of harm from falling or leaving the ward unsafely. Other patients may present with mental health needs that require additional therapeutic care to support and maintain safety of the patient and staff and reduce risk while in hospital.

Dr Wood is one of our Embedded Research Team (ERT) based within UCLH. The ERT works closely with staff and leaders across the Trust to improve patient care and provide research evidence that staff and management can use when planning and designing services. Victoria carried out a Rapid Appraisal study of Specialling and Nurse Specials and will share her learning about the appraisal, and speak about demystifying research for NHS staff.

 

Top of the charts! Lancet paper on HIV testing most downloaded in 2017

The end of any year sees a number of “best of” charts published and research is no exception!

We’re delighted to report that a paper produced by the CLAHRC’s Dr Werner Leber and Professor Chris Griffiths and others is 2017’s most downloaded in The Lancet HIV. Dr Werner ‘s groundbreaking work represents the first time a model to explore the cost effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care has been applied to the UK.

The work generated great media interest (below) and offers a model to measure cost-effectiveness for commissioners and providers of HIV care.

Read the paper:

Cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care: a health economics modelling analysis
Baggaley, Rebecca F et al.
The Lancet HIV , Volume 4 , Issue 10 , e465 – e474

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30123-6/abstract 

Read the most downloaded list

Read a BITE sized summary of Werner’s work.

 

 

 

Patient and Public Involvement workshops in Whitechapel

Our friends and colleagues at Barts Health NHS Trust are hosting some great new free training for researchers interested in involving patients and the public in their work.

New dates for 2018 have been added to this annual series of Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) workshops for researchers, funded by the Wellcome Trust, supported by UCLP and hosted by Barts Health and QMUL.

‘How to write the PPI section of a grant form’ will take place 24 January (1.30pm-4.30pm) at Charterhouse Square

and

‘Meaningful PPI? How was it for you?’ will take place 29 January (1pm-4pm) in Whitechapel.

For the full programme (extended to May 2018) and to book your place: http://www.uclhospitals.brc.nihr.ac.uk/investigators/ppi-training

or contact the Engagement and Diffusion team at patientsinresearch@bartshealth.nhs.uk

CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine joins Lancet-LSE commission on future of the NHS

CLAHRC Director Professor Rosalind Raine has been invited to be part of a major new independent inquiry considering the future of the NHS.

Professor Raine joins the Future of the NHS Commission which launched on November 30th and is organised by the London School of Economics and The Lancet. It will investigate and report on options for relieving the growing pressures on the system and ensuring that the service has governance, care, operating, and funding models fit-for-purpose in the 21st Century.

CLAHRC Director Rosalind Raine is Professor of Health Care Evaluation and the Head of the Department of Applied Health Research at UCL, as well as being an NIHR Senior Investigator

Professor Raine will draw on her expertise in evaluations of NHS interventions and research experience in inequalities in the distribution of health care, its causes, impact on health inequalities and policy responses.  She has long advised national, international and regional policy makers, her research being highly valued due to its diversity (spans acute & chronic conditions and all NHS settings), representativeness (national datasets, long time periods) and applied nature, allowing direct policy translation.

Calls for a rational, considered view of the NHS have come from across the political spectrum (see below) and the Commission will draw on a range of views and perspectives in its work. In April 2017 The Lancet argued that “An independent inquiry is needed to bring together clinical and policy experts, and the voices of the public and patients, to answer the question: what sort of NHS do we want and need in 2020, 2025, and 2030?”

Changing behaviour to improve adherence to asthma medication

CLAHRC behaviour change researchers and PhDs Caroline Katzer and Marissa Mes were a big hit at the recent in ESPACOMP conference in Budapest Hungary. Caroline and Marissa presented to an audience of clinicians and allied health professionals interested in adherence

ESPACOMP (European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance and Persistence) promotes science concerned with the assessment of what patients do with medicines they have been prescribed – and the implications when they adhere, or don’t adhere to them. Their 2017 conference brought together behaviour change practitioners and researchers from across the world and both Marissa and Caroline’s presentation generated much interest and a host of questions from the audience.

Both Caroline and Marissa are conducting their PhDs as as part of our wider work examining the effectiveness of  the ‘Perceptions and Practicalities Intervention’ (PAPI) in improving adherence to asthma medication.

 

Marissa (above) is investigating the effectiveness of pharmacists as the delivery channel of a theory-based intervention to support medication adherence in adults with asthma.

Caroline is focusing her PhD on developing the PAPI intervention to support adherence to maintenance treatment in adult asthma patients.

Both fielded questions from pharmacists interested in how their research/academic findings were going to be translated into pharmacy practice, and how feasible this would be.

Public health research: CLAHRC represented at prestigious Lancet conference

Three CLAHRC researchers were among those presenting their work at the Lancet’s prestigious event Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health held in London on November 24th.

Each of the CLAHRC’s researchers presented a poster about their work, and the topics highlight the breadth of our research. Their abstracts are now published in a special edition of the journal.

Dr Chiara De Poli presented projections of the likely impact of the various interventions currently being used to prevent diabetes across England.

Dr Esther Kwong presented her work exploring the potential for  patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) – patient questionnaires used to measure measures health gain in patients undergoing a number of surgeries – to be used when patients were admitted as an emergency.

Jennifer Martin presented her work on participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings.

 

Impact of interventions to prevent diabetes in England: a simulation model

De Poli, Chiara et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S36

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32971-9/fulltext

 

Can patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) be used in emergency admissions? Comparison of retrospective and contemporaneous PROMs after hip and knee replacement: a cohort study

Kwong, Esther et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S55

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32990-2/fulltext

 

Adaptations to the participatory learning and action cycle in resource-limited settings: an observational study

Martin, Jennifer S et al.

The Lancet , Volume 390 , S63

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32998-7/fulltext