How to guide to establish NHS youth forums

Children and young people are a key population for everyone working in the NHS and Public Health. Involving them in commissioning and designing services makes for more appropriate care that’s more likely to be taken up by those who need it

Our ground-breaking diabetes project worked with young people impacted by the condition in east London – we trained young co-inquirers in research skills so they could run community engagement events and analyse feedback on how to improve local diabetes services.

Our work was integral in shaping new NHS “how to” guidance to help commissioners and providers think through and develop youth forums to support person-centred commissioning of children and young people in health and care services.

The ‘how to guide’ is a recipient of the NHS England’s Celebrating Participation in Healthcare grant award scheme and has been authored by the University of East London (UEL)

Spreading the word about involving patients, carers and the public in research

A recent conference gave our Patient and Public Involvement Officer Steven Towndrow, joined by one of patient/public contributors Sudhir the chance to spread the word about involving patients and the public in research.

Sudhir (left) and Steven spread the word

We were invited to deliver a workshop on Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPI/E) by the Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research at University College London Hospitals Trust (UCLH) during their annual Research in Clinical Practice conference.

Sudhir and Steven delivered the seminar to an audience of nurses, midwives and Allied Health Professionals during the event which aims to involve more of these staff groups in leading NHS research.

Sudhir drew on his extensive experience of working with researchers to design and deliver projects, offering some top tips for successful involvement.

“Thank you so much for supporting our conference last week – both the workshop and exhibiting. Both were certainly popular and we’ve had really good feedback”
Professor Lesley Baillie – CNMR Director

Our thanks to the CNMR for the invite!

Professor Rosalind Raine

In the last 5 years Rosalind Raine has been awarded £16M (as PI and co-applicant) in AHR grants from NIHR, MRC, Wellcome Trust and other funders. Her research is of value to policy makers due to its diversity (spans acute & chronic conditions and all NHS settings), representativeness (national datasets,long time periods) and applied nature, allowing direct policy translation.

Her analyses have influenced national inequalities policies, EU policy makers, the Cabinet Office, the GLA, LAs and PCTs. She has held national leadership positions including the National Chair of the Heads of Academic Departments of Public Health (2010-2014). Her commitment to internationally competitive research which makes a major contribution to NHS, patients and the public is demonstrated by her membership of the: REF2014 Sub Panel for Public Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care; MRC Career Development Panels (2005-12); NIHR Programme Grant Experts Panel (2007-12) and the MRC Health Services & Public Health Research Board (2005-8). As National and Regional Chair of the UK Clinical Research Network (CRN) NIHR Health Services Research (HSR) Speciality Group (2009-11), she established networks of applied researchers across London Universities to promote research collaborations.

Nationally she worked with the CRN to achieve more appropriate inclusion of HSR in the CRN. Raine’s effective leadership and commitment to capacity building, led her to being asked to establish and lead the UCL Department of Applied Health Research (2012-). Current grants in the Department total £59.3M (as lead and co-applicants).

 

Prof Mike Roberts

Mike Roberts is an NHS Consultant Respiratory Physician at The Princess Alexandra Hospital and Community Services for West Essex. He also holds posts as Clinical Academic Lead for Population Health for UCLParters Academic Health Science Network, Clinical Director of the National Asthma and COPD Audit Programmes, and is hosted within the Institute of Primary Care and Population Health at Queen Mary University of London.

Dr Nora Pashayan

Nora is a Clinical Reader in Applied Health Research / Honorary Consultant in Public Health Medicine and has a clinical background with specialty training in both Family Medicine and Public Health Medicine. Her research is in cancer screening, particularly personalised screening.  She is the graduate tutor, and the educational supervisor for public health specialty registrars at the UCL Department of Applied Health Research.  http://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=NPASH45

 

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Professor Monica Lakhanpaul leads a multi-disciplinary translational research group at UCL, that focuses on Health Services Research which has direct impact on health policy and clinical practice. Her research program aims to take a multi-disciplinary, integrated and collaborative approach to improving outcomes for children. Her research also aims to transform services for patients.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research focuses on the translation of evidence into clinical practice and health policy, drawing together education, primary and secondary research to improve health outcomes for children. Her research crosses primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

Professor Lakhanpaul’s research falls under four main themes; Applied Translation of Evidence In to Policy and Practice (through systematic review, guideline development, decision and prediction rule development), Improvement Science (with a particular focus on partnership production with parents, patients and health professionals; co-production with communities to develop tailored health interventions: MIA study), Conditions (with a specific interest in respiratory illness; asthma, and the acutely sick child) and Inequalities in Health (tailoring interventions for hard to reach groups, health tourism and the use of translators and interpreters to reduce inequalities).