Allocating resources in difficult times; balancing public perception of need and where money is best spent

Health economics and economic evaluations of care are a key theme within our CLAHRC, and the subject of one of our successful Academy short course for front-line NHS and Public health professionals.

CLAHRC researcher and health economist Dr Elena Pizzo gave a lecture at the Royal Society of Medicines September event – the ‘4th breast cancer forum: screening, metastatic breast cancer and living with and beyond

This is now available to view via this link or clicking on the image below

Dr Pizzo’s presentation examined how money is best spent in patient treatment. Elena considered the average cost of breast cancer care per patient and outlines the challenges faced by health professionals and economists when deciding how treatment funding is allocated.

Dr Pizzo made a plea for health professionals, policy makers, industry and patients to work closely with health economists when making difficult decisions about where to allocate resources. In this case the topic was cancer but the message applies equally to many other specialties when NHS budgets are under pressure.

Evidence in public health decision-making – its creators and users need to come together

Decision-makers in public health can be confronted with a huge volume of data, evidence, reviews and summaries – from local and national sources. There is also an acknowledged gap between evidence and policy in public health.

In a recent blog on the EPPI centre website CLAHRC researchers Dylan Kneale and Antonio Rojas-García reflect on their work exploring the use of evidence in local public health decision-making – and raise the question – How much research is being wasted because it is not generalisable in local settings?

While reduced resources make judicious use of evidence more important than ever when deciding how and where to apply resources, researchers also need to understand, and better communicate, the generalisability of their research evidence to decision-makers working locally.

Read Evidence use in public health – make-do and mend?

 

Better data to improve health and wellbeing

We have been reaching out to colleagues in local authorities and public health departments to highlight the value of research evidence in improving health and well being among local populations. The CLAHRC is forging useful links with our partners in local councils, bridging the gap between research and the front line.

Local authorities are a key audience for the CLAHRC as they are responsible for public health in their area. Public health includes prevention of illness and disease, sexual health and smoking cessation.

CLAHRC partners Islington and Camden Councils run lunchtime learning sessions for staff as part of their Using Data Better initiative. They invite speakers from various sectors to present the potential for data to improve health and health services for local residents. The boroughs have joined forces to deliver public health, and have a team of data analysts at work –  identifying issues that have a negative effect on people’s health, and planning to deal with those issues.

In October Dr Chiara De Poli (below left) presented to public health staff and analysts in the two Councils.  Chiara was joined by the CLAHRC’s Professor Gwyn Bevan and health economist Dr Elena Pizzo, presenting evidence of the limited impact of current policy options on the projected diabetes ‘epidemic’ in Islington, which stimulated a lively discussion about what Islington might do to tackle this.

Chiara’s work is part of a wider CLAHRC study, led by Professor Bevan, investigating the design of research and decision support processes to ensure the utility of research outputs. We are making efforts to make our research more “user friendly” and accessible to colleagues in the NHS and local government so they can use it in decision-making around planning and commissioning services and interventions for the populations they serve.

There was learning on both sides – our researchers got an insight into the challenges faced by staff on the front line and an appreciation of the type of data local authorities collect and analyse to improve health and well-being. We offered projections on the likely impact on diabetes prevention of current policies adopted by local authorities.

Feedback from our audience was extremely positive and we hope this is the start of a fruitful collaboration between the CLAHRC and the Public health teams within Islington and Camden.

“Once again, thanks for delivering a wonderful presentation – many of us were fascinated by your progress, and it’s no surprise that our head of dept. is now keen to collaborate further”

Mustafa Kamara, Intelligence & Information Analyst, Camden and Islington Public Health

Patient and public involvement – learning and sharing with Peninsula CLAHRC

We recently went on a “learning exchange” visit to our friends and colleagues at NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula (PenCLAHRC).

It was a chance for researchers, staff and patient and public contributors from both CLAHRCs to meet each other.

We also took advantage of the combined expertise and experience of the assembled group to look at a research study early in development.

Read a report of the day here.

 

 

Category 3 – Patient/Service User/Carer with influence

Category 3 – Patient/Service User/Carer with influence

This award will recognise an individual who has actively connected service users, clinicians, researchers and other healthcare professionals and promoted the opportunities in collaborative working to improve research and healthcare.

What the judging panel will be looking for:

1. Activity that has been designed and delivered with the input of patients and carers from as an early stage as possible

2.Attempts to involve and engage people who are less likely to be heard but have much to say for example children and young people, those with learning difficulties or sensory impairments and people from minority communities including carers

3.Reflection and a desire to improve the practice of patient and carer involvement moving it away from a tick-box exercise to a two-way learning process

Background information to help you prepare

Information about eligibility and how to nominate (Brian_Turley_Awards_Eligibility criteria)

Information about preparing a nomination (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination information)

Nomination Form (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination form)

Category 2 – Early career researcher, including PhD students, service user researchers and members of CLAHRC Fellowship Programmes

This award will recognise an early career researcher, PhD student, service user researcher or Fellow. They will need to demonstrate their commitment to developing their experience and expertise in working with patients, service users, carers, families and communities in the design, delivery and evaluation of their work to ensure that their research or improvement addresses the needs and preferences of those using healthcare services.

This award is open to researchers who can demonstrate a direct connection with the London CLAHRC programmes for example through funding, supervision and mentoring or scrutiny in the CLAHRC governance structures.

Before entering, read and consider the following success criteria carefully

What the judging panel will be looking for:

1. Activity that has been designed and delivered with the input of patients and carers from as an early stage as possible

2.Attempts to involve and engage people who are less likely to be heard but have much to say for example children and young people, those with learning difficulties or sensory impairments and people from minority communities including carers

3.Reflection and a desire to improve the practice of patient and carer involvement moving it away from a tick-box exercise to a two-way learning process

Background information to help you prepare

Information about eligibility and how to nominate (Brian_Turley_Awards_Eligibility criteria)

Information about preparing a nomination (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination information)

Nomination Form (Brian_Turley_Awards_Nomination form)