Trends in evidence use in public health decision-making

A new CLAHRC publication offers valuable insight into the types of evidence used by decision-makers working in public health. In 2013, responsibility for public health services and planning shifted from the “health” boundary to local authority control. These services can range from health checks to open access sexual health.

CLAHRC researchers examined English local public health decision-making in a new review of what evidence is used and how by those planning, designing and commissioning services.

The review, published in a new paper in the Journal Implementation Science identifies three clear trends in evidence use

  • the primacy of local evidence
  • the important role of local experts in providing evidence and knowledge, and
  • the high value placed on local evaluation evidence despite the varying methodological rigour.

Barriers to the use of research evidence included issues around access and availability of applicable research evidence, and indications that the use of evidence could be perceived as a bureaucratic process.

This is part of a wider project entitled Exploring decision-making processes and knowledge requirements in public health

 

Read the full paper

Kneale et al. Implementation Science (2017) 12:53
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0577-9
The use of evidence in English local public health decision-making: a systematic scoping review

A fantastic free event to celebrate life changing research

Each year, the International Clinical Trials Day is celebrated around the world on or near the 20th of May in order to celebrate the day that James Lind started his famous trial on the 20th of May 1747.

On Wednesday 24 May this year, Barts Health NHS Trust (in association with Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry) will be hosting Research Matters event as part of the annual celebration of International Clinical Trials Day. This programme will feature talks from award-winning academics and clinicians, patients and others, to showcase the high quality clinical research taking place within Barts Health hospitals. For the full programme and to register your place: https://researchmatters2017.eventbrite.co.uk

There will also be a number of additional activities taking place in May in support of International Clinical Trials Day.  Look out for information stalls at Barts Health hospitals, where you will have a chance to talk directly to research staff and learn more about ways you can get involved in clinical research.  For more information see: www.bartshealth.nhs.uk/takepart

 

 

Event date: Wednesday 24 May 2017
Event time: 5pm until 6.30pm, followed by drinks reception (approx. 1hr)
Event registration: https://researchmatters2017.eventbrite.co.uk

Formal invitation to Research Matters

The value of theory in programmes to implement clinical guidelines: Insights from a retrospective mixed-methods evaluation of a programme to increase adherence to national guidelines for chronic disease in primary care