Success for CLAHRC Fellow Emma Dunphy

Physiotherapist and CLAHRC HEE NCEL Fellow Emma Dunphy has been successful in her application for a prestigious Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship with the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Emma’s proposed research will develop an E-Health intervention to improve rehabilitation for anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

After spending a year with the CLAHRC on our fellowship scheme honing her research skills Emma successfully applied to the NIHR scheme against stiff competition.

The HEE/NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship (CDRF) Scheme is aimed at registered non-medical healthcare professionals sited in England with at least 1 year’s experience of clinical practice, sufficient research experience or training to prepare them to undertake a PhD, and who wish to obtain a PhD by research whilst continuing to develop their clinical skills.

The full title for Emma’s research under the scheme will be Development of a model of service delivery to standardise anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation in the NHS and testing the feasibility of an E-Health intervention to support delivery of this model.

See a poster outlining Emma’s work below or download a PDF here.

 

Leading the campaign against pollution caused by diesel engines

The Doctors Against Diesel campaign that was launched in December 2016 and has already received widespread media coverage with ongoing interest from the health community, local government and media. The campaign is led by health professionals and is calling for the use of diesel fuels to be banned in urban areas and progressively phased out elsewhere. On February 22nd the CLAHRC’s Professor Jonathan Grigg led a workshop of nurses, doctors and allied health professionals to formulate health messaging and decide next steps in the campaign to reduce diesel use.

CLAHRC Deputy Director and Child Health Theme Lead Professor Jonathan Grigg is a prominent member of the campaign group and co-author of the Royal Colleges Report Every Breath We Take. Professor Grigg is a practising paediatrician with experitse in respiratory health, seeing first hand how pollution damages young and developing lungs. He also leads our School Asthma project which aims to improve management of the condition among children and young people.

Diesel engines are the single biggest source of nitrogen dioxide, which accounts for the vast majority of breaches of legal air pollution limits in the UK. Exposure to pollution can impact children and young people’s current and future health as strong evidence suggest it impairs lung growth in children.

 

 

 

 

A research trial with a difference

CLAHRC Researcher Professor Johnathan Grigg has been part of the ever largest study of the effects of a biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention on health outcomes. The intervention comprising two biomass-fuelled cookstoves, a solar charger, repair and maintenance service, and user training.

Many people in low- and middle-income countries do not have access to reliable energy sources such as electricity and therefore till cook and heat their homes using solid fuels (i.e. wood, crop wastes, charcoal, coal and dung). Around 3 billion people are obliged to use such inefficient cooking fuels and technologies which produce high levels of household air pollution with a range of health-damaging pollutants, including small soot particles that penetrate deep into the lungs.

Professor Grigg, the CLAHRC’s Deputy Director and Leader of our Child Health research Theme was part of a team investigating whether replacing open fires with cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstoves would reduce pneumonia incidence in young children.

The results, published in the Lancet found no evidence that an intervention comprising cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstoves reduced the risk of pneumonia in young children in rural Malawi. Researchers called for effective strategies to reduce the adverse health effects of household air pollution.

 

The World Health organisation (WHO) estimates exposure to air pollution from cooking with solid fuels is associated with over 4 million premature deaths worldwide every year including half a million children under the age of 5 years from pneumonia.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs292/en/

Read the full paper:

A cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstove intervention to prevent pneumonia in children under 5 years old in rural Malawi (the Cooking and Pneumonia Study): a cluster randomised controlled trial

Dr Kevin Mortimer, PhD’Correspondence information about the author Dr Kevin MortimerEmail the author Dr Kevin Mortimer, Chifundo B Ndamala, Dip, Andrew W Naunje, Jullita Malava, MPH, Cynthia Katundu, Dip, William Weston, MBChB, Deborah Havens, DO, Daniel Pope, PhD, Prof Nigel G Bruce, PhD, Prof Moffat Nyirenda, PhD, Prof Duolao Wang, PhD, Amelia Crampin, MPH, Prof Jonathan Grigg, MD, Prof John Balmes, MD, Prof Stephen B Gordon, MD

Published: 06 December 2016

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32507-7

Lancet Volume 389, No. 10065, p167–175, 14 January 2017

Making the Jump….to improved asthma management

Our Asthma Schools project is investigating asthma control among young people in schools and developing interventions to help them manage the condition better.

The project worked with Greenwich and Lewisham Young People’s Theatre (GLYPT) to produce a short film – Breaking the Jump – about the importance of asthma awareness among young people. It carries an important message for all young people living with the condition.

The film was shot at the LEAP Parkour Park in Westminster, London.

 

How to guide to establish NHS youth forums

Children and young people are a key population for everyone working in the NHS and Public Health. Involving them in commissioning and designing services makes for more appropriate care that’s more likely to be taken up by those who need it

Our ground-breaking diabetes project worked with young people impacted by the condition in east London – we trained young co-inquirers in research skills so they could run community engagement events and analyse feedback on how to improve local diabetes services.

Our work was integral in shaping new NHS “how to” guidance to help commissioners and providers think through and develop youth forums to support person-centred commissioning of children and young people in health and care services.

The ‘how to guide’ is a recipient of the NHS England’s Celebrating Participation in Healthcare grant award scheme and has been authored by the University of East London (UEL)

Spreading the word about involving patients, carers and the public in research

A recent conference gave our Patient and Public Involvement Officer Steven Towndrow, joined by one of patient/public contributors Sudhir the chance to spread the word about involving patients and the public in research.

Sudhir (left) and Steven spread the word

We were invited to deliver a workshop on Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPI/E) by the Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research at University College London Hospitals Trust (UCLH) during their annual Research in Clinical Practice conference.

Sudhir and Steven delivered the seminar to an audience of nurses, midwives and Allied Health Professionals during the event which aims to involve more of these staff groups in leading NHS research.

Sudhir drew on his extensive experience of working with researchers to design and deliver projects, offering some top tips for successful involvement.

“Thank you so much for supporting our conference last week – both the workshop and exhibiting. Both were certainly popular and we’ve had really good feedback”
Professor Lesley Baillie – CNMR Director

Our thanks to the CNMR for the invite!

Professor Rosalind Raine

In the last 5 years Rosalind Raine has been awarded £16M (as PI and co-applicant) in AHR grants from NIHR, MRC, Wellcome Trust and other funders. Her research is of value to policy makers due to its diversity (spans acute & chronic conditions and all NHS settings), representativeness (national datasets,long time periods) and applied nature, allowing direct policy translation.

Her analyses have influenced national inequalities policies, EU policy makers, the Cabinet Office, the GLA, LAs and PCTs. She has held national leadership positions including the National Chair of the Heads of Academic Departments of Public Health (2010-2014). Her commitment to internationally competitive research which makes a major contribution to NHS, patients and the public is demonstrated by her membership of the: REF2014 Sub Panel for Public Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care; MRC Career Development Panels (2005-12); NIHR Programme Grant Experts Panel (2007-12) and the MRC Health Services & Public Health Research Board (2005-8). As National and Regional Chair of the UK Clinical Research Network (CRN) NIHR Health Services Research (HSR) Speciality Group (2009-11), she established networks of applied researchers across London Universities to promote research collaborations.

Nationally she worked with the CRN to achieve more appropriate inclusion of HSR in the CRN. Raine’s effective leadership and commitment to capacity building, led her to being asked to establish and lead the UCL Department of Applied Health Research (2012-). Current grants in the Department total £59.3M (as lead and co-applicants).

 

Prof Jonathan Grigg

Professor Jonathan Grigg is one of the UK’s top paediatricians and an international leader in paediatric respiratory research. Since 2003, he has obtained over £11M in research grants as PI and co-applicant from MRC, NIHR, DH and charities. These funds supported air pollution and asthma research with national and international impact. He is the lead paediatrician for government advice on air pollution and children’s health as a member of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, and provides ad hoc advice on respiratory toxicity to the Committee on Carcinogens. He co-chairs the Royal College of Physicians Committee into “air pollution throughout the life course”. In leading the national paediatric research agenda, he organises all paediatric input into British Thoracic Society’s meetings, and as elected secretary to the Royal College Paediatrics and Child Health’s Academic Board, organises its Annual Meeting. He develops national research priorities in paediatric respiratory medicine as Chair of the British Paediatric Respiratory Society, ex chair and, now member, of the Clinical Study Group (Respiratory) for the Medicines for Children network, NIHR Programme Grant Experts Panel. He leads on paediatric respiratory infection and immunology as elected chair of this group in the European Respiratory Society. Nationally, he evaluates the cost effectiveness of therapies, as the paediatric lead of NICE Appraisal Panel A, and is an RCPCH-appointed expert adviser on asthma therapies to other appraisal panels. Locally, he leads on paediatric non-medicines research in NE London as regional LCRN representative to the national committee, and supports academic training as the RCPCH regional academic advisor.