iQUASER workshop for NHS Trust Boards

Helping NHS Trusts develop their quality strategies

Quality and quality improvement are now recognised as imperative for all NHS organisations in England. A recent workshop brought together leaders of six NHS Trusts to develop their organisation-wide quality improvement strategies.

QUASER (Quality and Safety in European Union Hospitals) is a research-based tool senior hospital leadership teams can use to identify the strengths and possible weaknesses in their organisation’s quality and safety improvement efforts, and what they need to do to improve. The QUASER Guide was the result of a three year project in 5 European countries which studied organisational and cultural factors influencing quality improvement (QI). The intervention provides suggested strategies for how Trusts could be organised better in order to deliver high quality and safe services.

Implementing QUASER in the UK 

The QUASER intervention is being implemented in the UK by one of NIHR CLAHRC North Thames’ industry partners, the Foresight Centre for Governance within GE Healthcare Finnamore. Foresight works with public services to develop and improve leadership and Board-level effectiveness. It is helping Boards in six NHS Trusts develop their organisation-wide QI strategies through QUASER.

Evaluating the intervention

In parallel to this work the CLAHRC is conducting an evaluation of this intervention to assess and understand its impact within the six Trusts taking part. As one of the projects under our Innovations in systems and models of health and health care research theme researchers will use quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the total costs & benefits of the different interventions.

The iQUASER Workshop

A workshop in early November was run by the Foresight Centre and offered the chance for the six participating Trust Boards to develop their organisation-wide quality improvement strategies. The one-day workshop brought together all participating NHS trusts. 23 board level executives and non-executives came together with the overriding aim to develop a collective understanding of the QUASER Guide, learn about the evidence which underpins it and develop a clear sense of the elements of an effective quality improvement strategy.

Prior to the event, senior leaders from the Trusts received analysis of their current QI strategic position, having completed the QUASER guide self-assessment tool. Trusts were able to review, reflect and discuss their results both in terms of areas of strength and those that may require further focus.

In the afternoon the board level executives convened to participate in the first of three ‘action learning sets’ aimed at creating a supportive environment for participating organisations to draw on their collective experience and wisdom of those present.

Next steps – By the close of the day the participants arrived at specific goals or commitments to take their quality improvement strategies and interventions forward. The group will reconvene for the second of three action learning sets in January.

Background to the iQUASER project  – the quality improvement agenda in the NHS

The Francis Report reinforced the need for effective quality improvement strategies within NHS Trusts. All NHS organisation in England are being mandated to provide care that is clinically effective, safe and provides as positive an experience for patients as possible. Successful improvement programmes are vital for achieving this so this programme is particularly timely.

For more information about the QUASER project and the Guide see: The QUASER project

CLAHRC widens access to training by switching learning online

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

How can training in research methods for front line NHS and public health staff be made more accessible and convenient? How do you translate a face-to-face course to an online learning resource?

Dr Helen Barratt (Deputy Director of the CLAHRC Academy) shared her experience of taking a successful face-to-face course and transforming it fully online and this work has been featured in a case study by the UCL Life Learning team entitled Translating a face-to-face course online

Our North Thames geography, plus work and time pressures faced by staff on the front-line of health and health care meant that not everyone interested in our popular Introduction to Evaluation course could access our regular programme held in Central London.

In the case study Dr Barratt discusses the unique challenges of preparing and delivering online learning using digital platforms and educational tools, and provides handy tips for educators approaching similar work.

Dr Mary Thomas

Mary is the Research Manager with the NIHR CLAHRC North Thames, having initially joined the CLAHRC as acting Manager (maternity cover). Previously, Mary worked at UCL as a Project Manager on an NIHR Programme Grant for Applied Research addressing social inequalities in uptake of bowel cancer screening, and in a number of research and administrative roles within UCL. Mary has a Masters in Demography & Health, and undergraduate degrees in English and Fine Art.

Lizette Ahenda

Lizette Ahenda joined in June 2016 to liaise with and involve school students, teachers, adolescent patients and their parents in content development of the intervention. She maintains close collaborations with Centre of the Cell learning team, child health practitioners and other project partners.

Since her BSc from the University of Hertfordshire in 2009, she has previous clinical experience as a Physiotherapist in primary and secondary NHS trusts, as well as from her birth place Nairobi, Kenya, collecting epidemiological data for a government hospital on community based health. Montreal, Canada offered opportunities in rehabilitation of stroke patients, children with motor impairments and YMCA gym programs for long term conditions. While in Montreal, Lizette worked in community outreach with children, youth and families. Here in the UK, she leads activities and mentors at a South London youth club.

Lizette graduated with an MSc in Global Health in 2015 from UCL and has since completed evaluation projects of community health programs in London Borough of Camden, conducted fieldwork for an Institute of Education trial of secondary school emotional health programs, as well as for an EU-MRC trial on men’s health programs for Glasgow University’s Social and Public Health Sciences Unit.

 

Paul McLaughlin

Paul McLaughlin is a mental health matron who spent a year with the CLAHRC to increase his research skills and pursue a clinical academic career. Paul qualified as a mental health nurse in 1999 and completed a Masters in Interprofessional Practice in 2007, both at City University in London. He is a visiting lecturer at City University, completing a PG Dip in Academic Practice in 2009, and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. At the commencement of the clinical academic fellowship in 2015, Paul was working as a ward matron in East London NHS Foundation Trust, where he has worked since he was a student.

His research focus was developing alternatives to forced treatment on acute psychiatric wards.

Janine Ellul

Janine qualified as an adult nurse in 2001 with a Bsc (Hons) in European Nursing Studies. This led to a varied career in a range of areas from acute medicine to sexual health and family planning. In 2009 she decided to become a health visitor, completing her Pgdip in Public health. Training and working as a health visitor in the East End of London, in some of the most deprived areas of the country, sparked her interest in safeguarding children.

Her most recent career move has led her to join the Safeguarding children team at Barts Health NHS trust, the largest trust in the country.

During her year with us Janine investigated issues around neglect and contrasting perceptions of neglect among parents and professionals

Emma Green

Emma  is a student pursuing a PhD titled “An exploration of an asset-based approach to the management of diabetes in young people: a qualitative participatory approach” supervised by Professor Angela Harden and Dr Darren Sharpe. It is embedded in the CLAHRC’s wider project examining the co-design of community-based services responsive to the needs of children and young people, which involves young people in all stages of the research process.